Unwritten rules lead to hard feelings in Astros-A’s game

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As you’ve probably heard, the A’s racked up seven runs in the first inning of their 11-3 win over the Astros on Friday night, knocking starter Jarred Cosart out of the game. That frame only ended when Jed Lowrie, batting for the second time in the inning with a man on, aimed for a bunt single against the shift and was thrown out at first.

Even though the bunt didn’t work and actually helped Houston’s cause, the Astros didn’t take too kindly to it. Paul Clemens’ very first pitch the next time Lowrie was up in the third was aimed at his knee and ended up right between his legs. The second was thrown inside, too. Eventually, Lowrie flew out to left-center and exchanged some words with Jose Altuve as he was taking off his batting gloves by the first base bag, at which point Astros manager Bo Porter exited the dugout and shouted at Lowrie and pointed as if to tell him to take his position.

So, yeah, we have an unwritten rule thing going on here.

The rule is that Lowrie shouldn’t have bunted. Even though it’s the first inning, and the Astros, while lousy, are still a major league team capable of scoring seven runs over the course of eight innings. Not that they’ve done so this year or anything, but capable, probably.

No, what Lowrie was supposed to do was to go up looking for a single.  Because swinging from the heels in that situation is also in violation of the unwritten rules. Also, it can’t be a cheap single, like a bunt. It has to be a legitimate single. Of course, the shift-happy Astros have their fielders in the absolute best position they can to deny Lowrie singles. But that’s just his tough luck.

This is why I can’t stand unwritten rules.

In my head, the best way to respect the opposing team is to go out there and play the absolute best game you can. If it were the eighth inning, then, yeah, bunting for a hit in a 7-0 game would be bush league. But in the first inning? Heck no. And I think the Astros waive all rights to be upset about this kind of thing when they’re still putting on the shift, something they continued to do long after Lowrie’s bunt. If you’re trying to take away the half of the field a player usually hits to, you can’t get all huffy when he tries to use the open area you’re giving him.

Luke Voit avoids concussion after taking 91 mph fastball to face

Luke Voit
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Yankees first baseman Luke Voit exited Saturday’s game under less-than-ideal conditions after a 91.4-m.p.h. fastball caught him on the chin in the fourth inning. Following his removal, he passed the standard concussion protocol testing, though the Yankees will likely play it safe with the infielder over the next few days.

With one out and a runner on first, Voit stepped up to bat against Chad Bettis in the bottom of the fourth inning. He had just worked an 0-2 count against Bettis when the mishap occurred — a fastball that deflected off of his shoulder and met his chin. Voit took a few moments to recover, then took first base before he was eventually lifted from the game at the top of the fifth.

Prior to his exit, the first baseman went 0-for-1 with a walk. He was subsequently replaced by DJ LeMahieu, who shifted over from third to first base while Gio Urshela stepped in at the hot corner.

The Yankees currently lead the Rockies 11-5 in the eighth.