Unwritten rules lead to hard feelings in Astros-A’s game

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As you’ve probably heard, the A’s racked up seven runs in the first inning of their 11-3 win over the Astros on Friday night, knocking starter Jarred Cosart out of the game. That frame only ended when Jed Lowrie, batting for the second time in the inning with a man on, aimed for a bunt single against the shift and was thrown out at first.

Even though the bunt didn’t work and actually helped Houston’s cause, the Astros didn’t take too kindly to it. Paul Clemens’ very first pitch the next time Lowrie was up in the third was aimed at his knee and ended up right between his legs. The second was thrown inside, too. Eventually, Lowrie flew out to left-center and exchanged some words with Jose Altuve as he was taking off his batting gloves by the first base bag, at which point Astros manager Bo Porter exited the dugout and shouted at Lowrie and pointed as if to tell him to take his position.

So, yeah, we have an unwritten rule thing going on here.

The rule is that Lowrie shouldn’t have bunted. Even though it’s the first inning, and the Astros, while lousy, are still a major league team capable of scoring seven runs over the course of eight innings. Not that they’ve done so this year or anything, but capable, probably.

No, what Lowrie was supposed to do was to go up looking for a single.  Because swinging from the heels in that situation is also in violation of the unwritten rules. Also, it can’t be a cheap single, like a bunt. It has to be a legitimate single. Of course, the shift-happy Astros have their fielders in the absolute best position they can to deny Lowrie singles. But that’s just his tough luck.

This is why I can’t stand unwritten rules.

In my head, the best way to respect the opposing team is to go out there and play the absolute best game you can. If it were the eighth inning, then, yeah, bunting for a hit in a 7-0 game would be bush league. But in the first inning? Heck no. And I think the Astros waive all rights to be upset about this kind of thing when they’re still putting on the shift, something they continued to do long after Lowrie’s bunt. If you’re trying to take away the half of the field a player usually hits to, you can’t get all huffy when he tries to use the open area you’re giving him.

Video: White Sox turn triple play against Astros

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White Sox starter Iván Nova was able to escape a jam in the third inning of Wednesday night’s game against the Astros with the help of a triple play. Nova had allowed a leadoff double to Tony Kemp, then hit Robinson Chirinos with a pitch to put runners on first and second base with no outs. Facing Jake Marisnick in a 1-1 count, Nova threw a 94 MPH fastball that Marisnick sharply grounded to Yoán Moncada right at the third base bag. Moncada quickly fired the ball to Yolmer Sánchez at second base, then Sánchez whipped the ball to José Abreu at first base just ahead of a lunging Marisnick to complete the triple-killing.

According to Baseball Almanac, it’s the 718th known triple play dating back to 1876. The last time the White Sox turned a triple play was 2016. They turned three triple plays that season, amusingly. The Astros have been victimized by two of the last three triple plays, having also hit into one on April 19 last year against the Mariners.