Chris Sale has no use for statistics and that’s totally fine

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Yahoo’s Jeff Passan has a story about Chris Sale and what makes him tick. One thing that doesn’t make him tick? Attention to advanced metrics. Or any metrics, really. He says he doesn’t look at his ERA or anything else all season. He just pitches. What’s more:

“All I know I’ve got to do is give up less runs than we score,” Sale said. “I don’t care about anything else. Not the numbers. Not the ISPFMLBLSSRs and whatever else Brian Kenny has come up with to define what makes a good player or not.”

Reminded the numbers love him, Sale said: “I don’t love them back.”

Sad. Because now he’ll never realize that when he lost his no-hitter by giving up a homer to Xander Bogaerts last night it was a textbook case of ISPFMLBLSSR regression. How he doesn’t care about that I have no idea.

In all seriousness, though: baseball players have no more of a need to know about or even care about advanced metrics than supernovas have to know about or care about telescopes. The stats aren’t for them, they’re for people trying to understand or explain what they do or trying to put teams together. And ballplayers did everything they do long before Henry Chadwick wrote down the first box score.

It’s one thing if a ballplayer seems to have no grasp of what he needs to do in order to perform his job well. That’s kind of a problem. But there’s no reason on Earth a ballplayer needs to understand why what he does is significant as long as he knows what the heck he’s doing. And Chris Sale knows what the heck he’s doing.

Peter Bourjos returns to the Angels on minor league deal

Peter Bourjos
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Free agent outfielder Peter Bourjos is heading back to the Angels on a minor league deal, per a report from Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors. The agreement includes an invitation to spring training, but has not yet been officially confirmed by the team.

Bourjos, 31, played out a one-year gig with the Braves in 2018 and slashed .205/.239/.364 with four extra-base hits and a .603 OPS through a career-low 47 plate appearances. He showed more promise during a short-lived stint with the Giants’ Triple-A squad in the second half of the season, but elected free agency in early November and had yet to catch on with another major league club. His deal with the Angels represents a homecoming of sorts, as he played some of the best years of his career in Anaheim from 2010 to 2013 before getting traded to the Cardinals in a multiplayer swap for David Freese and Fernando Salas in 2014.

The veteran outfielder is long past his prime, but could still bring some value to the team as outfield depth behind Justin Upton, Mike Trout, and Kole Calhoun. Per Adams, he’s expected to compete for a spot as the Angels’ fourth outfielder, though he also has limited experience at DH as well.