After a long, arduous journey, Seth Rosin returns to the Phillies

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MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki reports that right-handed pitcher Seth Rosin has cleared waivers and returned to the Phillies. Rosin had joined the Rangers in late March and made his Major League debut on March 31, tossing a scoreless inning against the Phillies. In total, he allowed three runs in four innings for the Rangers before they designated him for assignment to make room for third baseman Kevin Kouzmanoff on the roster.

Rosin has had an interesting life over the last four months. The Mets picked him up in the Rule 5 draft from the Phillies in December, then turned right around and sent him to the Dodgers for cash. During spring training, Rosin posted a 1.64 ERA in 11 innings for the Dodgers and traveled with the club to Australia to open up the season against the Diamondbacks. After returning to the United States, the Dodgers put him on waivers near the end of March, which is when the Rangers grabbed him. Now he has come full circle and returned to the Phillies, who acquired Rosin in the trade that sent Hunter Pence to the Giants in July 2012.

Rosin will report to Triple-A Lehigh Valley. Though Mike Adams is nearing a return, there is a chance Rosin could join the big league club, as the Phillies’ bullpen has been a shambles to start the season.

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Jim Crane thought the heat over sign-stealing would blow over by spring training

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The Astros’ sign-stealing story broke in November, a steady drumbeat of coverage of it lasted through December and into January, when Rob Manfred’s report came out about it. The report was damning and, in its wake, Houston’s manager and general manger were both suspended and then fired.

After that a steady stream of media reports came out which not only made the whole affair seem even worse than Manfred’s report suggested, but which also suggested that, on some level, Major League Baseball had bungled it all and it was even worse than it had first seemed.

Rather than Manfred and the Astros putting this all behind them, the story grew. As it grew, both the Red Sox and Mets fired their managers and, in a few isolated media appearances, Astros’ players seemed ill-prepared for questions on it all. Once spring training began the Astros made even worse public appearances and, for the past week and change, each day has given us a new player or three angrily speaking out about how mad they are at the Astros and how poorly they’ve handled all of this.

Why have they handled it so poorly? As always, look to poor leadership:

Guess not.

In other news, Crane was — and I am not making this up — recently named the Houston Sports Executive of the Year. An award he has totally, totally earned, right?