Great Moments in Pitching Statistics: Jim Johnson with the hold, Joe Nathan with the win

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Gotta love the arbitrariness of the pitching decision stats. There are wins, losses, holds and saves, and all of them are subject to silliness. Two great examples happened yesterday.

In the A’s-Twins game, Jim Johnson came into the game with a two-run lead in the ninth, loaded the bases with a single and a couple of walks, then allowed the Twins to single in a run, leaving the bases loaded. Dan Otero comes in and allows a sac fly and retires the rest of the guys he faces. Johnson gets the hold — considered a positive decision for a relief pitcher — and Otero gets the blown save, even though he did almost everything he could to limit the damage done by Johnson.

In the Tigers-Dodgers game, closer Joe Nathan came into the ninth inning with a three-run lead. He have up a homer, two walks and a single to load the bases, then allowed two of those three base runners to score, blowing the lead and sending the game to extra innings. Though he wouldn’t throw another pitch in the game, he was still the pitcher of record when Victor Martinez hit the go-ahead home run in the 10th, so Nathan got the win.

Just remember that the next time someone cites saves, holds, wins or blown saves to explain why a given pitcher is good or bad.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.