Bud Selig, the Braves still think Hank Aaron is the all-time home run leader

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Last I checked 762 > 755, but don’t tell that to the Commissioner of Baseball or anyone associated with the Atlanta Braves:

Speaking with reporters after the ceremony, Selig was asked about Aaron being called the true home run king.

“I’m always in a sensitive spot there, but I’ve said that myself and I’ll just leave it at that,” Selig said.

If that’s the standard we are well and truly screwed, because these are things Bud has also said himself:

  • No one wants replay
  • Abner Doubleday invented baseball
  • We’re committed to finding a solution to the A’s stadium situation
  • We tried to keep the Expos in Montreal.

As a long-time friend of Hank Aaron’s Selig is obviously going to be partial to the guy and you can’t begrudge him his personal feelings. As the Commissioner of Baseball, however, he has an obligation to either recognize the records set as legitimate or to do something to render them officially illegitimate. He can’t have it both ways.

The Braves will always want it that way, of course:

During the ceremony Braves chairman Terry McGuirk said Aaron “set the home-run record the old-fashioned way” and added “You will always be the home run king of all time.”

Retired Braves broadcaster Pete Van Wieren earned a big ovation when he said Aaron is “still recognized as baseball’s true home run king.”

When McGuirk and Van Wieren agree to vacate the wins with which the Braves were credited while David Justice, Gary Sheffield, Darren Holmes, John Rocker, Paul Byrd, Mike Stanton, Matt Franco, Denny Neagle, Todd Pratt and Kent Mercker were on the team, fine, then they can have their own true home run king. Until then, they’d be better served to let baseball’s records fall where they may.

Dustin Pedroia going back on injured list

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Welp, that didn’t last long. Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia is going back on the injured list with more knee issues. If it matters the Sox say it’s not a big deal and they expect him back sooner rather than later, but they also said that his post-2017 knee surgery was just a “cleanup” at first and that basically cost him a year. So.

Pedroia has played in six games and is 2-for-20 with a walk.

I don’t think it’s hyperbole to say that Pedroia’s career may be nearing an end. Sure, he’s under contract for two more years after this season, but he’s also in a unfortunate spiral that so many players experience in their mid-to-late 30s.

Running a website like this makes it all the clearer, actually. When you search a player’s name in our CMS, you get every post in which he appears in reverse chronological order. Just about every long-tenured player ends with about six posts in which he is alternately placed on and activated from the disabled/injured list. Then an offseason link to a big feature in which he’s written about as being “at a crossroads” followed by something vague about “resuming baseball activities” and then, inevitably, the retirement announcement. I can’t count the number of guys whose careers I can tick off in that way by browsing the guts of this site.

I hope that’s not the case for Pedroia. I hope that there’s a “Pedroia wins Comeback Player of the Year” post in the future. Or at the very least a silly “Miller’s Crossing” reference in an “And that Happened” in which I say “the old man’s still an artist with the Thompson” after he peppers the ball around in some 3-for-4, two-double game. I want that stuff to happen.

It’s just that, if you watch this game long enough, you realize how unlikely that is once a player starts to break down.