Is A-Rod being investigated for obstruction of justice? What about Major League Baseball?

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This from the Daily News over the weekend is interesting. There’s a grand jury convened in Florida arising out of the whole Biogenesis thing. And it may bring A-Rod back into the headlines:

The grand jury is primarily interested in determining the source of the drugs Biogenesis founder Anthony Bosch supplied to Rodriguez and other players, one of the sources told The News. But other law-enforcement officials are trying to determine if Rodriguez, currently serving a season-long suspension for violating MLB’s drug policy, attempted to obstruct investigations into the defunct Coral Gables anti-aging clinic.

I find this a little rich. A-Rod may or may not have tried to obstruct MLB investigators — the evidence on that was rather thin, as the small portion of his suspension related to obstruction showed — but last I checked Major League Baseball is not law enforcement. I know they act like it all the time, what with the Mitchell Report and the Biogenesis thing, but they really are just a private business with revenues somewhere between the largest law firms and mid-sized regional supermarket chains.

Also, last I checked, it was Major League Baseball, not Alex Rodriguez, who paid off the very man who distributed the drugs that are subject to this grand jury investigation and purchased stolen documents in the course of its own investigation. Who provided him with counsel in the event anyone comes investigating him and indemnified him from any bad things that may come his way as a result. I don’t know if that’s obstruction of justice, but it’s way closer to the kind of things that get charged as such than the stuff A-Rod is said to have done.

So, sure, investigate Alex Rodriguez. But explain why Major League Baseball shouldn’t be investigated too.

Report: Pirates to convert JB Shuck into two-way player

JB Shuck
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Rob Biertempfel of The Athletic reports that the Pirates have decided to convert outfielder JB Shuck into a two-way player. Recent comments relayed from the club’s director of player development, Larry Broadway, indicated that the outfielder would be coached in developing his pitching skills while working at Triple-A Indianapolis.

Per Broadway, the change would be enacted to help the veteran outfielder develop some much-needed versatility in the majors, where he’s only ever been limited to outfield and DH responsibilities. Well, except for the two games in which he pitched an inning of relief: once, against the Nationals in a blowout 11-4 loss in 2016, then in a similarly painful loss to the Diamondbacks this past April. During the latter outing, he finished the game with a 13-pitch ninth inning after allowing just one hit and one walk.

Add to that one minor-league outing in 2012, and the 31-year-old Shuck has pitched just three times over the course of his 12-season career in pro ball. While he has three years of experience on the mound from his college days, he’ll need quite a bit of preparation to handle the kind of workload expected from a two-way outfielder/reliever: 20+ innings pitched over a season and 20+ games played as a designated hitter or position player.

Still, his lack of experience doesn’t seem to faze Broadway, at least not this early in the process. There’s no word yet on how soon Shuck would be expected to debut his new skillset on a major-league level.