Ryan Braun given a thunderous standing ovation, media unhappy

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He’s at home in Milwaukee, and you can imagine that things will be quite different when he goes on the road. But for now, Ryan Braun is everyone’s darling. When he came to bat in the bottom of the first inning in this afternoon’s Braves-Brewers game, Braun received a loud, enthusiastic standing ovation from the home faithful.

As you can imagine, this disgusted people:

Of course the one thing all of those people have in common is that they are members of the media. And they’ll tell Brewers fans what they should or should not feel about Ryan Braun, I’ll tell you what.

But how about these possibilities: (1) Fans will cheer for guys wearing their laundry no matter what they do; and/or (2) fans may be fully aware of Ryan Braun’s track record but really don’t give a crap because all they want out of him and their team is a couple hours of entertainment five or six times a week.

But you’re right, media. It’s possible that they’re just stupid.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.