Jenrry Mejia suffers forearm bruise from comebacker, X-rays clean

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UPDATE: Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that X-rays came back clean and Mejia is dealing with inflammation. No word yet on his status for the Opening Day roster.

9:47 a.m ET: Mets right-hander Jenrry Mejia has made a strong case for a rotation spot this spring, but a comebacker could put him on the outside looking in.

Mejia left last night’s exhibition game against the Blue Jays at Olympic Stadium after he was hit in the right forearm with a ball off the bat of Ryan Goins in the bottom of the fifth inning. Adam Rubin of ESPN New York reports that the initial diagnosis is a forearm bruise, but he was sent to a local hospital to undergo X-rays.

Mets manager Terry Collins appeared to be leaning toward starting Mejia in the fourth game of the season next Friday against the Reds, but Daisuke Matsuzaka would get the spot if a trip to the disabled list is necessary. That’s not ideal, as Matsuzaka is viewed as insurance in case Jon Niese isn’t able to make his season debut next Sunday. Niese has been slowed with minor shoulder and elbow issues during spring training.

Mejia allowed one run over four-plus innings before his early exit last night and owns a 2.70 ERA and 13/6 K/BB ratio over 13 1/3 innings this spring.

Zack Cozart thinks the way the Rays have been using Sergio Romo is bad for baseball

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The Rays started Sergio Romo on back-to-back days and if that sounds weird to you, you’re not alone. Romo, of course, was the star closer for the Giants for a while, helping them win the World Series in 2012 and ’14. He’s been a full-time reliever dating back to 2006, when he was at Single-A.

In an effort to prevent lefty Ryan Yarbrough from facing the righty-heavy top of the Angels’ lineup (Zack Cozart, Mike Trout, Justin Upton), Romo started Saturday’s game, pitching the first inning before giving way to Yarbrough in the second. Romo struck out the side, in fact. The Rays went on to win 5-3.

The Rays did it again on Sunday afternoon, starting Romo. This time, he got four outs before giving way to Matt Andriese. Romo walked two without giving up a hit while striking out three. The Angels managed to win 5-2 however.

Despite Sunday’s win, Cozart wasn’t a happy camper with the way the Rays used Romo. Via Fabian Ardaya of The Athletic, Cozart said, “It was weird … It’s bad for baseball, in my opinion … It’s spring training. That’s the best way to explain it.”

It’s difficult to see merit in Cozart’s argument. It’s not like the Rays were making excessive amounts of pitching changes; they used five on Saturday and four on Sunday. The games lasted three hours and three hours, 15 minutes, respectively. The average game time is exactly three hours so far this season. I’m having trouble wondering how else Cozart might mean the strategy is bad for baseball.

It seems like the real issue is that Cozart is afraid of the sport changing around him. The Rays, like most small market teams, have to find their edges in slight ways. The Rays aren’t doing this blindly; the strategy makes sense based on their opponents’ starting lineup. The idea of valuing on-base percentage was scoffed at. Shifting was scoffed at and now every team employs them to some degree. Who knows if starting a reliever for the first three or four outs will become a trend, but it’s shortsighted to write it off at first glance.