Contracts may appear crazy, but teams’ revenue increases vastly outstrip player salary increases

62 Comments

The majority of people weighing in on Miguel Cabrera’s new deal are going to exclaim how crazy it is and how baseball players are overpaid, but it’s probably worth remembering that since 2002, baseball player total salaries, as a share of new revenue, have declined from 56 percent to 40 percent. And that as average payroll has gone up by 58 percent in that time, team revenue has gone up by 122 percent.

That comes from Matt Swartz of The Hardball Times, who drops some Econ 101 on us about these things — with lots of graphs and data and stuff — concluding that, while eyes continue to pop every time a new contract is signed, baseball players are getting increasingly smaller pieces of the growing baseball revenue pie.

So, lament the “greedy” players all you want. But don’t forget to think about what the owners are making these days. And that’s without even picking up a bat or a glove.

Blue Jays call up Cavan Biggio

Getty Images
2 Comments

Cavan Biggio, son of Hall of Famer Craig Biggio, has been called up by the Toronto Blue Jays.

Biggio, 24, was a fifth round selection in the 2016 draft. So far this year he has put up a .307/.445/.504 batting line with six home runs and five steals Triple-A Buffalo. He’s a utility guy of sorts, having spent time at first, second, third and all three outfield positions so far this year. He, perhaps ironically, has not caught yet in his pro career, nor does he play short. Still, that kind of flexibility in a young player can be pretty useful in this age of big bullpens. Especially if he continues to rake like he has. He’ll likely mostly play second base for the Jays starting out.

With Vlad Guerrero Jr. playing third base every day, Toronto now has two sons of Hall of Famers on their roster. That’s pretty neat.