We tend to ignore the hard work, as opposed to the athleticism, of black players

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The basis for this New York Magazine piece on the different way broadcasters describe black athletes and white athletes is college basketball, but it’s every bit as applicable to baseball too. Whites are described as hard workers — and their hard work is often specifically described — blacks are assumed to be naturally gifted and athletic and their hard work is often overlooked.

And it’s not out of animus or bigotry. It just happens because it has always happened that way:

The situation is far better than it was three or four decades ago, when announcers would liken the skills of black players to animals. Today, they have some awareness of racial stereotyping. What’s left, I think, is far more characteristic of how racial bias typically works. Bad intent does not come into play. White people simply have certain preconceptions, and preconceptions make you see the things you expect to see and miss the things you don’t.

I agree with all of that, with the possible exception of likening the skills of black players to animals. That still happens:

source:

I don’t care if Vin Scully is the one who coined “Wild Horse” for Puig. It still falls into this rubric of attributing the exploits of some players to some beastly, untamed quality that is so often used as a placeholder for otherness that we don’t too closely examine.

Video: Ramon Torres hits little league home run in first at-bat of season

Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
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The Royals recalled infielder Ramon Torres from Triple-A Omaha on Saturday. He didn’t get into a game until starting Thursday night’s game against the Rangers, batting ninth.

In the top of the second inning, facing Austin Bibens-Dirkx, Torres laced a single up the middle. Center fielder Delino DeShields charged in on it, attempting to keep Ryan Goins at second base, but the ball went right past his glove, through his legs, and nearly trickled all the way to the warning track. Goins scored easily and Torres was waved home, too. He managed to narrowly beat the throw, touching home plate with his left hand on a head-first slide.

The play was officially scored a single and a three-base error. Torres wasn’t credited with an RBI on the play. But at least the Royals got two runs out of it.