Shin-Soo Choo, Adrian Beltre banged up

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I often note at this time of year that spring training means nothing. The team is 10-3? Your left fielder is batting .429? That’s swell. But it also means nothing because spring training results often — heck, mostly — don’t carry over into the regular season. Even when they do, there’s no reliable way to know beforehand that they were going to.

But health is a different matter. A sore something-or-other is a sore something-or-other be it in early March or early April. So look to health, more than anything else, when trying to figure out if your team is doomed out of the gate or not.

The Rangers aren’t doomed. Far from it. But they do have a couple of key dudes who aren’t feeling 100%:

 

and

The minor elbow pain Shin-Soo Choo experienced a week ago has lingered, and Thursday he received an injection of anti-inflammatory medication to combat it.

Beltre has dealt with leg issues in the past — and so much of his power comes from that to-the-knee swing he employs, which is so very much leg-generated. As such, a bad lower half could be bad news for Beltre.

As for Choo, he says that the pain is normal for him this time of spring training and that it always clears up after ten days or so. Were it the regular season, he’d be playing every day, no worries.

Worth watching in the early going.

Video: Starling Marte refuses to take first base after being hit by pitch

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Pirates outfielder Starling Marte was hit on the hand by a Jack Flaherty pitch in the fourth inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Cardinals. Rather than take first base, Marte — who came to the plate with a runner on first base — insisted to home plate umpire Bruce Dreckman that the ball hit the knob of the bat, not his hand. Marte was allowed to continue his at-bat, though manager Clint Hurdle came out to discuss the ruling with Dreckman. Marte eventually grounded into a fielder’s choice. He then got caught attempting to steal second base and the Pirates scored zero runs in the inning.

According to Baseball Prospectus, a team that has runners on first and second with no outs is expected to score 1.55 runs. Having a runner on first base with one out yields 0.56 expected runs. Marte essentially cost his team a run by rejecting first base. Oops.