Red Sox prospect gets arrested, acts like a monumental jackwagon

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Yahoo!’s Jeff Passan has a report about one of the more obnoxious baseball player arrests you’ll ever see. The player: Red Sox’ minor league catcher Jon Denney. The reason for the arrest: driving with a suspended license. But the flavor of the arrest is way better than the charge might indicate:

According to police, Denney said “he was a Boston Red Sox player and he didn’t care [sic] he had money and made more money than we would ever see.” When handcuffed, the report said, Denney said “he would be out in no time because of who he played for and that he made three million a year.”

This, by the way, was his second run-in with the police that evening. Earlier, he had been issued a citation and sent home after being pulled over for fishtailing and was then found to have had a restricted license (work and emergencies only, due to a previous DUI ). At the time of the citation he said he was out on the town “Partying and looking to get some [expletive].” I’m assuming that the censored part was not “dinner” or  “some personal enlightenment.”

Just an epic performance by young Mr. Denney, here. He plays the “I’m rich and famous card,” yet, as Passan notes, he’s not really either of those things. Plus he gets bonus points for the previous DUI, the blatant honesty on why he was out on the town and the subtle style which comes from driving a Ford F-150 Raptor, which is about an 80 on the cool bromobile scale.

Well played indeed. Especially for a guy who hit .203 in the Gulf Coast League last year. I think his future is bright.

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
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The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.