Red Sox prospect gets arrested, acts like a monumental jackwagon

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Yahoo!’s Jeff Passan has a report about one of the more obnoxious baseball player arrests you’ll ever see. The player: Red Sox’ minor league catcher Jon Denney. The reason for the arrest: driving with a suspended license. But the flavor of the arrest is way better than the charge might indicate:

According to police, Denney said “he was a Boston Red Sox player and he didn’t care [sic] he had money and made more money than we would ever see.” When handcuffed, the report said, Denney said “he would be out in no time because of who he played for and that he made three million a year.”

This, by the way, was his second run-in with the police that evening. Earlier, he had been issued a citation and sent home after being pulled over for fishtailing and was then found to have had a restricted license (work and emergencies only, due to a previous DUI ). At the time of the citation he said he was out on the town “Partying and looking to get some [expletive].” I’m assuming that the censored part was not “dinner” or  “some personal enlightenment.”

Just an epic performance by young Mr. Denney, here. He plays the “I’m rich and famous card,” yet, as Passan notes, he’s not really either of those things. Plus he gets bonus points for the previous DUI, the blatant honesty on why he was out on the town and the subtle style which comes from driving a Ford F-150 Raptor, which is about an 80 on the cool bromobile scale.

Well played indeed. Especially for a guy who hit .203 in the Gulf Coast League last year. I think his future is bright.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.