Red Sox prospect gets arrested, acts like a monumental jackwagon

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Yahoo!’s Jeff Passan has a report about one of the more obnoxious baseball player arrests you’ll ever see. The player: Red Sox’ minor league catcher Jon Denney. The reason for the arrest: driving with a suspended license. But the flavor of the arrest is way better than the charge might indicate:

According to police, Denney said “he was a Boston Red Sox player and he didn’t care [sic] he had money and made more money than we would ever see.” When handcuffed, the report said, Denney said “he would be out in no time because of who he played for and that he made three million a year.”

This, by the way, was his second run-in with the police that evening. Earlier, he had been issued a citation and sent home after being pulled over for fishtailing and was then found to have had a restricted license (work and emergencies only, due to a previous DUI ). At the time of the citation he said he was out on the town “Partying and looking to get some [expletive].” I’m assuming that the censored part was not “dinner” or  “some personal enlightenment.”

Just an epic performance by young Mr. Denney, here. He plays the “I’m rich and famous card,” yet, as Passan notes, he’s not really either of those things. Plus he gets bonus points for the previous DUI, the blatant honesty on why he was out on the town and the subtle style which comes from driving a Ford F-150 Raptor, which is about an 80 on the cool bromobile scale.

Well played indeed. Especially for a guy who hit .203 in the Gulf Coast League last year. I think his future is bright.

Zach Davies replaces Gio Gonzalez on the Brewers roster

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Major League Baseball just announced that it has approved a roster substitution for the Milwaukee Brewers due to the ankle injury sustained by Gio Gonzalez: right-handed pitcher Zach Davies will take his place. In accordance with league rules, Gonzalez will be ineligible to return if the Brewers make it to the World Series.

That rule is designed to prevent roster gamesmanship such as having a pitcher fake an injury after he’s done being used in an effort to give a team a fresh arm in a short series. A second layer on that is an independent consult with the league, which may approve or disapprove the request based on the specific facts and circumstances of the case. In this case, Dr. Gary Green, MLB’s Medical Director, confirmed Gonzalez’s injury after communicating with the Brewers’ evaluating physician. Not that anyone can really suggest that Gonzalez was faking. The dude’s ankle went sideways.

That being said, this is a benefit to the Brewers at least for the short term. Davies did not have a fantastic season, going 2-7 with a 4.77 ERA in 13 starts and failing to make the Brewers’ initial postseason roster, but he is fresh — he hasn’t pitched since September 28 — which could prove very useful for Craig Counsell and the Brewers after last night’s 13-inning game.