Mets pitching coach dropped ethnic slur in clubhouse

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You’ll want to read the entire story from Stu Woo of the Wall Street Journal, but here’s an excerpt:

In the New York Mets locker room Monday morning, I was talking with Jeff Cutler, a 30-year old Japanese American from suburban Boston who serves as the interpreter for Japanese-born pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka.

We were talking casually about Asian communities in America when we heard a voice behind us.

“Jeff!”

Cutler and I turned around. It was Dan Warthen, the Mets pitching coach.

“I’m sorry I called you a ‘Chinaman’ yesterday,” Warthen told Cutler.

“It’s OK,” Cutler replied.

“I didn’t mean to insinuate –- I know you’re not Chinese,” Warthen said. He paused. “I thought it was a pretty good joke, though.”

“It was,” Cutler said, with a small laugh.

Warthen walked away.

Woo asked Cutler if he was offended by the joke and Cutler said he wasn’t, but Woo then asked Cutler to provide the gist of the joke and Cutler responded, “You should ask Dan (Warthen) about that.”

Warthen was supposed to meet with Woo in the Mets’ dugout at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday to discuss what happened but he didn’t show, sending word through Mets vice president of media relations Jay Horwitz that he wasn’t going to comment further about the exchange. Warthen did decide to issue a written statement on Wednesday night, packaged with accompanying words from Mets general manager Sandy Alderson …

Warthen: “I apologize for the thoughtless remarks that I made yesterday in the clubhouse. They were a poor attempt at humor, but were wrong and inappropriate in any setting. I am very sorry.”

Alderson: “On behalf of the entire organization, I apologize for the insensitive remarks made by of one of our staff members. The remarks were offensive and inappropriate and the organization is very sorry.”

Warthen has been the Mets’ pitching coach since 2008. He pitched in the majors from 1975-1978.

Jean Segura hits a three-run homer to put the AL up 5-2 in the eighth

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As we moved to the top of the eighth inning things started to loosen up. Which was good for the American League but not for the Senior Circuit.

Josh Hader of the Brewers was pitching and, in very un-2018-style, the American League strung together a couple of hits, with Shin-Soo Choo and George Springer singling. At that point Jen Segura of the Mariners came to the plate while Joe Buck spoke to National League outfielder Charlie Blackmon on the mic. Blackmon was entertaining until Joey Votto failed to corral a would-be foul out from Segura, at which point he tensed up a bit. Then Segura launched a massive three-run homer to left. Blackmon called Buck “bad luck,” Mitch Moreland singled and Blackmon said that if the next pitch wasn’t a double play ball, he was bailing on the broadcast.

With the Americans leading 5-2, Dave Roberts made a pitching change, bringing in Brad Hand with one out in the inning. Buck bid adieu to Blackmon, for which Blackmon seemed thankful. These mic’d up players are fun, but there’s a limit to how much distraction they’ll endure, even in a meaningless exhibition game.

Hand struck out Michael Brantley and then