Kris Medlen leaves game with right forearm strain

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Braves right-hander Kris Medlen made an early departure from a Grapefruit League appearance on Sunday against the Mets after appearing to injure his elbow on a pair of consecutive fourth-inning pitches.

Medlen grabbed at his throwing elbow following his second-to-last delivery of the game and then skipped to the Braves’ dugout after his final pitch, which had no life on it and landed well in front of home plate.

It sure looked like a serious injury, but there’s really no point in speculating. The Braves’ medical staff should provide an update on his status soon.

Medlen, 28, boasts an outstanding 2.47 ERA in his last 335 major league frames.

He underwent Tommy John reconstructive elbow surgery in the summer of 2010.

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UPDATE, 3:11 p.m. ET: According to MLB.com beat reporter Mark Bowman, the early diagnosis is a right forearm strain. Which could mean anything. Medlen will be reevaluated by team doctors on Monday.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.