Astros use private online database called “Ground Control”

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Evan Drellich has an in-depth feature in the Houston Chronicle about the Astros’ built-from-scratch private online database, which is now being used by the entire baseball operations department to improve scouting, communicating, and decision-making.

It’s called “Ground Control,” a play on the Astros’ name. The Indians have a similar database called “DiamondView,” the Red Sox call theirs “Carmine,” and the for the Cardinals it’s labeled “Red Bird Dog.”

The Astros feel like their database might be the best-looking and most functional. More from Drellich:

Ground Control has an extraordinarily clean interface. There’s nothing intimidating about it for any experienced computer user.

Video of players can be downloaded on the spot, and most anything the baseball operations folks do goes through it – from looking up the history of a player in a foreign country to preparing scouting reports of the Yankees for this season’s opening day.

Projections and the like are updated after every game for which reliable statistics are available, including winter league games in other countries.

“Ground Control” was built by Astros senior technical architect Ryan Hallahan. Read the article here.

Behold: The new Marlins logo

Marlins
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The Marlins have not released their new uniform design — at least not yet — but they did release their new logo today. That’s it up top. It’s not too bad? Here’s the secondary logo, which you could maybe imagine on a cap?

The logo appears at the end of the video below which is, until the final few seconds, not about baseball at all. It’s about Miami. A “this is our town” promotional thing which takes you on a tour and shows you people and the culture of the city.

A lot of times when sports teams do this stuff it seems somewhat contrived, but I think it’s pretty cool here. The Marlins have almost never sent much of a “we are a part of our community” message. Jeff Loria lived in New York for Pete’s sake and, of course, they infamously consider themselves a foreign corporation for legal purposes. Before this, the most they ever seemed to want out of Miami is tax subsidies and to be left the hell alone.

You can’t just market your way into a community — and the Marlins have a long way to go before they can earn back any sort of trust from baseball fans in Miami —  but the fact that they are at least trying to make themselves part of the Miami community is probably worth something.

Anyway: