Yankees considering using Alfonso Soriano as back-up first baseman

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Over his 15-year career, Yankees outfielder Alfonso Soriano has logged time at five of the eight non-pitcher positions on the diamond. The only three positions he hasn’t played are catcher, first base and right field. He might make it six this season. ESPN’s Andrew Marchand reports that manager Joe Girardi has kicked around the idea of using Soriano at first base to spell Mark Teixeira from time to time.

“We have kicked it around a little bit,” manager Joe Girardi said.

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Soriano, who will play in the outfield Friday night, will primarily be a designated hitter. However, he could spell Mark Teixeira from time to time during the season. The Yankees do not plan to carry strictly a backup first baseman.

Kelly Johnson, the team’s starting third baseman, is listed as the back-up first and second baseman. Given that Johnson is neither two nor three people, the Yankees would like to diversify their portfolio, so to speak, which explains brainstorming Soriano at first.

At the age of 37 last season, Soriano blasted 34 home runs and posted a .791 OPS with the Cubs and the Yankees. He moved back to the Bronx in a trade at the end of July. Soriano’s contract expires at the end of the season and he’s been mulling retirement.

Dale Murphy’s son hit in eye by rubber bullet during protest

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Atlanta Braves legend Dale Murphy took to Twitter last night and talked about his son, who was injured while taking part in a protest in Denver.

Murphy said his son nearly lost his eye after he was hit in the face by a rubber bullet while peacefully marching. He later shared a photo (see below). “Luckily, his eye was saved due to a kind stranger that was handing out goggles to protestors shortly before the shooting and another kind stranger that drove him to the ER,” Murphy said.

Murphy had far more to say about the protests, however, than how it related to his son:

“As terrible as this experience has been, we know that it’s practically nothing compared to the systemic racism and violence against Black life that he was protesting in the first place. Black communities across America have been terrorized for centuries by excessive police force . . . If you’re a beneficiary of systemic racism, then you will not be able to dismantle it at no cost to yourself. You will have to put yourself at risk. It might not always result in being physically attacked, but it will require you to make yourself vulnerable.”