The Collective Bargaining Agreement won’t be changed until it expires

17 Comments

Yesterday, Brewers starter Kyle Lohse criticized the qualifying offer system. Lohse rejected a $13.3 million qualifying offer from the Cardinals after the 2012 season, hoping to get a lucrative deal in free agency. He ended up jobless well into march until the Brewers jumped in and signed him to a three-year, $33 million deal. This season, Ubaldo Jimenez, Nelson Cruz, Ervin Santana, Stephen Drew, and Kendrys Morales were jobless when spring training began in mid-February. Only recently have Jimenez and Cruz signed; Santana is rumored to be signing with a team soon, while Drew and Morales are in limbo.

Lohse isn’t the only one to criticize the system. Drew criticized it several weeks ago, as did players union chief Tony Clark.

Brad Ziegler, Diamondbacks pitcher and member of the MLBPA’s executive subcommittee, says the CBA won’t be changed until it expires in December 2016. Via Gabe Lacques of USA TODAY:

“The CBA won’t be reopened,” Ziegler, a member of the players’ association’s executive subcommitee, told USA TODAY Sports on Saturday. “There’s no way it’s a big enough deal to do that right now. I haven’t heard any rumblings that’s even realistic.”

Rangers, Padres, White Sox to continue paying minor leaguers

Nashville Sounds
John Rivera/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Leave a comment

In March, Major League Baseball agreed to pay minor league players $400 per week while the sport is shut down amid the coronavirus pandemic. That provision is set to expire at the end of May. As Craig noted earlier, the Athletics will not be paying their minor leaguers starting on June 1.

Several teams are doing the right thing, continuing to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week through at least the end of June. Per The Athletic’s Levi Weaver and James Fegan, the Rangers and White Sox will each tack on another month of pay. The Athletic’s Dennis Lin reported earlier that the Padres will pay their players through the end of August. Craig also cited a Baseball America report from this morning, which mentioned that the Marlins will also pay their players through the end of August.

Frankly, if the Marlins can find a way to continue paying their minor league players, then every team should be able to do the same. The Marlins are widely believed to be the least profitable among the 30 major league clubs. Here’s hoping the rest of the league follows the Rangers’, White Sox’s, Padres’, and Marlins’ lead as opposed to the Athletics’.