Chew tobacco, chew tobacco, chew tobacco, spit

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Just about every ballpark you go to plays that Blake Shelton song, “Boys ’round here” during warmups or batting practice:

Yeah the boys ’round here
Drinking that ice cold beer
Talkin’ ’bout girls, talkin’ ’bout trucks
Runnin’ them red dirt roads out, kicking up dust
The boys ’round here
Sending up a prayer to the man upstairs
Backwoods legit, don’t take no s**t
Chew tobacco, chew tobacco, chew tobacco, spit

Not my sort of song, but it’s a freakin’ ear worm anyway. That last line is the one that sticks in my head all the damn time too. I’ve found myself driving around down here going “Chew tobacco, chew tobacco, chew tobacco, spit” at random times. Just awful.

But definitely appropriate for ballparks. Because as Pete Abraham of the Boston Globe reports today, smokeless tobacco use among ballplayers is still pretty popular:

Smokeless tobacco use stubbornly remains a part of baseball, even though Major League Baseball has tried to discourage its use for the last few years because it is known to increase the risk of cancer. While smokeless tobacco use is not as prevalent in baseball as it was several years ago, a survey of the 58 Red Sox players invited to spring training this year found 21 who admitted to using it.

Abraham talks to David Ortiz, Jonny Gomes and many other Red Sox who talk about when they use and why. It’s a really interesting read, mostly because the players tend to talk about how they don’t really like the stuff, don’t do it all the time and aren’t addicted, yet they do it all the same, mostly out of routine. Because, I guess anyway, doing something you don’t particularly like out of habit … is not addiction?

Anyway, go check it out. Good story.

Cardinals shut down Carlos Martínez for two weeks due to shoulder issue

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MLB.com’s Jenifer Langosh reports that the Cardinals are shutting down pitcher Carlos Martínez from throwing for two weeks because his shoulder strength isn’t where it should have been at this point. Langosch added that an MRI showed no structural damage in Martínez’s right shoulder.

Interestingly, president of baseball operations John Mozeliak didn’t sound too happy with Martínez offseason training regimen. Per Mark Saxon of The Athletic, Mozeliak said, “Obviously, there’s a history with Carlos’ shoulder and it would be probably in everybody’s best interest if he maintained a constant or perpetual approach to that program.”

Martínez, 27, battled oblique and shoulder injuries last year. He accrued just 118 2/3 innings, making just 18 starts. He was moved to the bullpen when he returned from the disabled list in August and finished out the season in that role. Still, Martínez managed a 3.11 ERA with 117 strikeouts and 60 walks.

Langosch reported last week that the Cardinals were considering using Martínez in relief again in 2019. The latest news may push the Cardinals to indeed use Martínez out of the bullpen once again. He will be reevaluated in early March, but there is a chance he won’t be ready for Opening Day.