Video: Yasiel Puig throws out Mike Trout on inside-the-park home run attempt

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Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy? You decide.

Baseball fans were provided with a heaping slice of awesomeness in this afternoon’s Cactus League matchup between the Dodgers and Angels, as Mike Trout’s attempt at an inside-the-park home run was dashed thanks in part to a throw from Yasiel Puig.

In the bottom of the first inning, Trout scorched a line drive to center field off Dan Haren which landed beyond the reach of a diving Puig and bounced toward the outfield wall. After tracking the ball down, Puig made a strong throw to cut-off man Hanley Ramirez, who turned and threw to catcher A.J. Ellis just in time to nail a diving Trout at home plate.

Watch the video in all its glory below:

[mlbvideo id=”31452283″ width=”400″ height=”224″ /]

Angels manager Mike Scioscia immediately came out to challenge the play. However, while it was originally assumed that he was arguing that Trout’s hand touched home plate before Ellis’ tag, he was actually contesting whether the new home-plate collisions rule was being followed properly. Trout would have been awarded home plate if Ellis was found to be in violation of the rule, but the umpires found no wrong-doing after looking at the replay. According to Alden Gonzalez of MLB.com, the play at home was reviewed as a “crew-chief challenge,” so Scioscia didn’t use his challenge in the situation. Yes, this new system is going to take some getting used to.

Race and Sports in America: Jimmy Rollins on impact of George Floyd’s death and BLM

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Former major league shortstop Jimmy Rollins was among a handful of professional athletes to sit down and talk with NBCSN about the intersection of race and sports in America. The nation hit a flashpoint on May 25 when George Floyd was killed by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. Chauvin kneeled on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes. The event sparked worldwide protests, including all across the U.S.

In the excerpt below, Rollins discusses gun culture as a Black man as well as what it was like to watch the video of Floyd’s death.

Race and Sports in America: Conversations is a one-hour show with two segments that debuts on NBCSN on Monday, July 13 at 8 pm ET. It will be simulcast on Golf Channel, Olympic Channel, and the regional sports networks. Along with Rollins, Kyle Rudolph, Anthony Lynn, Troy Mullins, James Blake, Steph Curry, Charles Barkley, Ozzie Smith, and Jerome Bettis participated in the discussions.


DAMON HACK:  Is it exhausting, Jimmy?  How exhausting is it?  Chuck talked about it; it’s not new for a lot of people, but it’s new for maybe the majority of Americans.  But this is nothing new for the Black community.

JIMMY ROLLINS:  Nothing new at all.  We’ve seen video after video after video, usually resulting in someone getting shot for doing something they’re asked, because their color is their gun.  Being the wrong color in the wrong neighborhood means you’re an automatic threat.

But when you look at the majority of gun owners they aren’t Black men or Black people in general.  We shy away from gun stores.  We shy away from getting permits and licenses to carry because we’re not comfortable even when we walk in.

So going to a gun store, am I a criminal?  That’s the first thing you’re thinking they’re thinking.  Well, what do you need the gun for?  Who are you planning to go kill?

Yet, when we get pulled over or when we’re just walking down a street or doing just the normal things that any American or any person in this world is doing, we’re already a threat for doing it.  And if you’re in a wrong neighborhood, what are you doing here?  You have to be up to no good.

So it’s something that isn’t new.  George Floyd’s situation, watching a man being suffocated and choked out like that for eight minutes and 46 seconds, that was new.  We’ve seen people get shot.  It’s, like, okay, he’s going to get shot again.

When I was watching the video, not knowing the full story prior to it, I just pulled it up and it was there, I’m thinking, okay, he got up and he got shot.  But as it gets going, this man really is kneeling on his neck with no remorse.  It was kind of like, I don’t want to listen to you because I don’t have to.  So that part was new.

Here’s a guy actually being choked out with a man on top of him making a decision:  I am taking your life because I can ‑‑ over a $20 or a counterfeit $20 bill?  You don’t die over that.