Rich Hill joins Red Sox after death of newborn son

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Non-roster left-hander Rich Hill had been away from the Red Sox since the start of camp due to a family health issue. On Thursday, he arrived in camp and elaborated on his absence, passing along the sad news that his newborn son has died.

“€œWe had a son on December 26 and he was born with multiple issues that we confronted and had to deal with, as we were moving through the last couple of months at Mass General,”€ Hill told WEEI’s Rob Bradford. “Unfortunately he succumbed and he has passed. He taught us a lot of things, and unfortunately things didn’t work out.”

Hill made the trip to Florida with his wife and 2 1/2-year-old son, and they’ll remain together as the southpaw attempts to win a spot in the Boston bullpen.

The 33-year-old Hill, who was born in Boston, spent parts of three seasons with the Red Sox before joining the Indians a year ago. He had a 6.28 ERA in Cleveland, though that came with 51 strikeouts in 38 2/3 innings. He chose to return to Boston in part due to family reasons. “€œIt was a strong correlation there,” Hill said. “€œFortunately I had the opportunity to come back. The Red Sox have been tremendous with this whole part of our life.”

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.