Diamondbacks open to trading a shortstop, perhaps for a catcher

22 Comments

The Diamondbacks currently have youngsters Didi Gregorius and Chris Owings fighting it out for their shortstop job, but they’ve weighed settling the battle with a trade, the Arizona Republic’s Nick Piecoro reports.

The preference would be to acquire a catcher who could potentially back up Miguel Montero in the near future and eventually supplant him as a starter.

“For us, it would have to be the right deal,” Arizona GM Kevin Towers told Piecoro. “Our biggest needs in our system are catching. If it’s the right, top-notch catching prospect. Someone we could have right behind Miggy. More of an upper-level guy. Maybe a top, upper-end starter. We have a lot of bullpen depth, infielders. Maybe an outfielder, but probably more catching and Double-A, Triple-A type starter.”

Of the two, Owings would likely have the greater trade value because of his offensive potential. Towers might prefer that anyway, as he’s already stated that Gregorius is the favorite to retain the job.

One obvious suitor for either player is the Mets, but Newsday’s Marc Carig says the two sides haven’t talked since the winter meetings. He adds that the Diamondbacks would probably want Travis d’Arnaud in return, which wouldn’t fly. The Mets have another solid catching prospect in Kevin Plawecki, but a source told Carig that he’s not the kind of talent Arizona is requesting.

The Yankees could also use a shortstop of the future, and catching is the one real strength in their farm system; Gary Sanchez has a high ceiling on offense and John Ryan Murphy could be an average regular or at least a really good backup. Towers also has a good working relationship with the Yankees, having worked in their front office before joining the Diamondbacks. A match there could be a possibility.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.