Jim Thome wants to be a manager

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Jim Thome hasn’t officially announced his retirement yet, but the 43-year-old joined the White Sox front office as a special assistant to general manager Rick Hahn.

That gig involves going to spring training to work with players beginning next week, but looking beyond that Thome told Daryl Van Shouwen of the Chicago Sun Times that he wants to be a manager some day:

Ultimately, I would love to get back on the field. Last year was so nice to be at home with my kids, watching my son play T-ball and taking my daughter to school every morning, and I love it. But I will say I do miss the game because I am a competitor. You can’t play forever, but the love of the game never leaves your soul. …

I want to look at what the next phase is for me getting back on the field, competing at a high level. There is a side to me that wants to manage someday and prepare myself for it if that opportunity came calling. I’d want to be ready.

Thome played 22 seasons for six different teams and was the most popular person in the clubhouse at every stop among teammates and media members alike, so his transitioning to coaching–and eventually perhaps managing–seems like an obvious fit.

Pete Alonso wins 2019 National League Rookie of the Year Award

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Mets first baseman Pete Alonso was named the 2019 National League Rookie of the Year as voted on by the Baseball Writers Association of America. He received 29 of 30 first-place votes.

Alonso, 24, made the Mets’ Opening Day roster and, like Álvarez, looked major league-ready as soon as he debuted. He finished the season as the league leader in homers with 53 while also knocking in 120 runs, scoring 103 runs, and batting .260/.358/.583 over 693 trips to the plate. FanGraphs listed Alonso with 4.8 WAR, by far the most among rookies. Alonso also won a little thing called the Home Run Derby, earning $1 million in the process. He donated $50,000 apiece to two charities, Tunnel to Towers Foundation and the Wounded Warrior Project.

Alonso, rated as the No. 48 prospect in baseball before the season started, is the first Met to win the award since starter Jacob deGrom in 2014. He is the sixth Met to win it, joining deGrom as well as Dwight Gooden (1984), Darryl Strawberry (1983), Jon Matlack (1972), and Tom Seaver (1967).

Braves starter Mike Soroka finished in second place and Padres shortstop Fernando Tatis Jr. finished in third. Also receiving votes were Bryan Reynolds, Dakota Hudson, and Victor Robles.