Stephen Drew critical of draft pick compensation system

68 Comments

Players have reported to their respective spring training sites in Florida and Arizona, but free agent shortstop Stephen Drew is still looking for home. While Drew is said to be looking for $14 million per season, being attached to draft pick compensation has undoubtedly had an impact on his market. He told CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman yesterday that he believes the current system is unfair and needs some tweaking:

“You hate to say it, but it really messes up free agency for guys who worked hard,” Drew said. “A lot of people don’t want to give up that first-round pick, and that’s what it boils down to. It’s unusual. I understand draft picks, but at the same time, you have a guy who’s proven as very good on defense and a top five shortstop if you look at it.”

“Our union has been really good. But I think we really have to look at this,” Drew said. “Is this really good for free agency? Our players need to sit back and look at it and see what we need to do about it.”

According to Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times, new MLBPA head Tony Clark said yesterday that there “will be dialogue” about the draft pick compensation system and its impact on free agency. However, Heyman writes that we might not see any changes until after the current collective bargaining agreement expires in 2016. As for Drew’s agent, Scott Boras, he’s not worried about finding a deal for his clients.

“Talent has no wristwatch,” Boras said. “When you’re the steak, you don’t worry about what time dinner is.”

Most Scott Boras quote ever? Most Scott Boras quote ever.

Heyman does pass along one new interesting nugget on the Mets suggesting a salary of around $9.5 million for Drew, which is what he made last year. However, the veteran shortstop continues to hold out for something better.

Nationals’ major leaguers to continue offering financial assistance to minor leaguers

Sean Doolittle
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
1 Comment

On Sunday, we learned that while the Nationals would continue to pay their minor leaguers throughout the month of June, their weekly stipend would be lowered by 25 percent, from $400 to $300. In an incredible act of solidarity, Nationals reliever Sean Doolittle and his teammates put out a statement, saying they would be covering the missing $100 from the stipends.

After receiving some criticism, the Nationals reversed course, agreeing to pay their minor leaguers their full $400 weekly stipend.

Doolittle and co. have not withdrawn their generosity. On Wednesday, Doolittle released another statement, saying that he and his major league teammates would continue to offer financial assistance to Nationals minor leaguers through the non-profit organization More Than Baseball.

The full statement:

Washington Nationals players were excited to learn that our minor leaguers will continue receiving their full stipends. We are grateful that efforts have been made to restore their pay during these challenging times.

We remain committed to supporting them. Nationals players are partnering with More Than Baseball to contribute funds that will offer further assistance and financial support to any minor leaguers who were in the Nationals organization as of March 1.

We’ll continue to stand with them as we look forward to resuming our 2020 MLB season.

Kudos to Doolittle and the other Nationals continuing to offer a helping hand in a trying time. The players shouldn’t have to subsidize their employers’ labor expenses, but that is the world we live in today.