David Price thinks Masahiro Tanaka affected his trade market during the off-season

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David Price’s name has been and will continue to be thrown around in trade rumors as the lefty $14 million in 2014 and is eligible for arbitration for one more year before hitting free agency. The small market Rays are expected to eventually trade Price as they have done in the past with Matt Garza and James Shields.

The trade could have happened this off-season, but Price thinks that the Masahiro Tanaka bidding slowed down the market as teams waited for the Japanese star to pick a team. Tanaka eventually signed with the Yankees on January 22 on a seven-year, $155 million deal. From ESPN’s Jayson Stark:

“I felt like this offseason, everything just kind of fell in my corner, for me to stay with the Rays,” Price said Saturday, on the first day of his seventh spring training as a Ray. “With Tanaka not being able to sign until the 24th [of January] and stuff like that, it seemed like teams waited for that market to fall. You know, if he had signed during the winter meetings or something, it might have been a little bit different. That would have given teams a lot more time to figure out what they wanted to do.

“So I thought that after Tanaka signed, that next seven or eight days were pretty big. After that, I got to breathe a little bit. And today is a big day as well. Once I got to spring training, I felt like I would kind of be here.”

The Indians, Giants, Dodgers, Mariners, and Rangers were among the teams interested when rumors were rampant earlier this off-season.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.