Alex Rodriguez dismisses his lawsuit against MLB, MLBPA

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This is pretty unexpected. Alex Rodriguez has filed a notice with the court dismissing his lawsuit against Major League Baseball and the the MLBPA.  It’s a voluntary dismissal pursuant to Federal Rule 41(a)(1)(A)(i), which means that he can re-file it at a later date if he wishes to.

There is no explanation with the notice as to why A-Rod dismissed the suit. There can be any number of explanations, actually. Some tactical, I presume, but there is no obvious advantage to him doing this now apart from the fact that he was supposed to respond today to the MLBPA’s motion to have the claims against it dismissed. Now he doesn’t need to. But he will if and when he brings the suit again. And, of course, if he doesn’t, his suspension stands as-is and it’s the same as if he’s lost the case.

Major League Baseball just issued the following statement. It believes this is over for good:

 “We have been informed that Alex Rodriguez has reached the prudent decision to end all of the litigation related to the Biogenesis matter.  We believe that Mr. Rodriguez’s actions show his desire to return the focus to the play of our great game on the field and to all of the positive attributes and actions of his fellow Major League Players.  We share that desire.”

And it may very well be.  One reason parties might dismiss a case without prejudice: settlement talks are afoot. I wouldn’t believe for a second that settlement talks between A-Rod and MLB are going on now — why would MLB bother? — but maybe A-Rod and the union are talking for some reason.  Another possibility: A-Rod didn’t file the case seeking injunctive relief (i.e. seeking an immediate order to have his suspension stopped and a quick hearing on the matter). Perhaps he refiles in order to get such an order.

Another possibility? A-Rod wants everything to just stop. He — or his lawyers — are leaving an out in case minds change sometime soon, but if A-Rod woke up this morning, called his lawyers and said “stop the case, I’m done” this is what they’d probably file. Followed by a dismissal with prejudice once everyone had a chance to meet and talk about it.

But no matter the motivation, my guess is that the Biogenesis case is over.

Roy Halladay won’t wear Blue Jays or Phillies cap on Hall of Fame plaque

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In 2016, late pitcher Roy Halladay was asked if he would prefer to wear a Blue Jays or Phillies cap on his plaque if he were to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Per Mark Zwolinski of the Toronto Star, Halladay said, “I’d go as a Blue Jay.” He added, “I wanted to retire here, too, just because I felt like this is the bulk of my career.”

Obviously, circumstances have changed as Halladay tragically died in a plane crash in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Florida in November 2017. Halladay was elected to the Hall of Fame yesterday, becoming the first player to be posthumously elected to the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility since Christy Mathewson in the Hall of Fame’s inaugural year.

Today, Arash Madani reports that Halladay’s wife Brandy said her late husband will not wear a cap with the emblem of either team on his plaque. He will instead be portrayed with a generic baseball cap. Brandy said, “He was a Major League Baseball player and that’s how we want him to be remembered.”

Halladay spent 16 years in the majors, 12 with the Blue Jays and four with the Phillies. He meant a lot to both teams. He was a six-time All-Star and won the AL Cy Young Award in 2003 with the Jays. He won the NL Cy Young in 2010 with the Phillies and was a runner-up for the award in 2011, making the All-Star team both years and helping the Phillies continue their streak of reaching the postseason, which lasted from 2007-11. Halladay authored a perfect game in the regular season against the Marlins and a no-hitter in the postseason against the Reds as a member of the Phillies in 2010 as well.

In aggregate, Halladay won 203 games with a 3.38 ERA and 2,117 strikeouts in 2,749 1/3 innings during his storied 16-year career which was unfortunately cut a bit short by injuries.