Ian Kinsler rejected a possible trade to the Blue Jays

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Shi Davidi of SportsNet reports that the Jays had two potential trades fall through this offseason: one for Brett Anderson, one for Ian Kinsler. The Anderson deal fell through due to the Jays’ concern over his health. Kinsler was a different matter:

But a potential deal was scuttled by the three-time all-star’s no-trade clause, leaving the Rangers to look elsewhere, and the Blue Jays to anoint rookie Ryan Goins as the front-runner at second base.

You wonder what caused the rejection. Could be any number of things. The fact that the Jays still likely profile as a bottom-of-the-division team. Canadian taxes. A long blood-feud with Adam Lind. The possibilities are endless.

I wonder about the turf. Only two ballparks in the game still have fake grass and one of them is Toronto. Players hate that stuff. The Jays are slated to lose the turf by 2018 when the Argonauts leave Rogers Centre. You have to think it’ll help their chances to attract better players.

 

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.