The Yankees sign Masahiro Tanaka to a $155 million deal

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And now, the big news we’ve been waiting for:

The Yankees officially announced the Tanaka signing this afternoon.

Many, including this writer, assumed the Dodgers were the front-runners. But that’s what one gets for assuming. The Yankees, of course, have always been mentioned as a strong possibility as well. New York provides a huge platform, the Yankees have deep pockets and, of course, Tanaka’s agent Casey Close is also Derek Jeter’s agent, providing a long track record of business dealings between him and the Yankees brass.

This puts to an end the Yankees’ alleged goal of getting the payroll below $189 million and thus avoiding luxury tax payments. But that’s Hal Steinbrenner’s problem, not Yankees’ fans. More important to them is that the Yankees now have a front line starter to go along with CC Sabathia at the top of the rotation. If Tanaka can come anywhere close to approximating his work in Japan and if Sabathia regains his old form, the Yankees’ 1-2 punch will be hard to match.

As for what he did in Japan: a 99-35 record with a 2.35 ERA and 1,238 strikeouts against 275 walks in 1,315 innings pitched across seven seasons. In 2013 he was 24-0 with a 1.27 ERA and a 183/32 K/BB ratio in 212 innings, leading the Rakuten Golden Eagles to the NPB World Series title.

Matt Carpenter hit a standup bunt double

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The wave of defensive shifts we’ve seen over the past few years has led to a lot of armchair hitting coaches demanding that players bunt to beat it. This is easier said than done, however.

The shift happens because certain hitters tend to pull the ball. Certain hitters tend to pull the ball because pulling the ball is what happens when one gets a strong, quick swing on a pitch one identifies early and which one endeavors to send as far away from home plate as possible. Which is to say that pulling is a skill that is good to have and which is strongly selected for among hitters.

In light of that, “why not just bunt to beat the shift” takes are kind of lazy. Bunting is hard! And it is not a thing guys who get shifted a lot are good at. Most of the time asking a player to do a thing he is not well-equipped to do is a bad idea. Indeed, a hitter voluntarily going away from his strength is something the defense would much prefer.

Most of the time anyway.

Last night Matt Carpenter made those armchair hitting coaches happy by laying down a bunt to beat the shift. And he laid it down so well that he ended up with a standup double:

One batter later Carpenter scored on a Starlin Castro error.

The shift giveth and the shift taketh away.