The Yankees sign Masahiro Tanaka to a $155 million deal

225 Comments

And now, the big news we’ve been waiting for:

The Yankees officially announced the Tanaka signing this afternoon.

Many, including this writer, assumed the Dodgers were the front-runners. But that’s what one gets for assuming. The Yankees, of course, have always been mentioned as a strong possibility as well. New York provides a huge platform, the Yankees have deep pockets and, of course, Tanaka’s agent Casey Close is also Derek Jeter’s agent, providing a long track record of business dealings between him and the Yankees brass.

This puts to an end the Yankees’ alleged goal of getting the payroll below $189 million and thus avoiding luxury tax payments. But that’s Hal Steinbrenner’s problem, not Yankees’ fans. More important to them is that the Yankees now have a front line starter to go along with CC Sabathia at the top of the rotation. If Tanaka can come anywhere close to approximating his work in Japan and if Sabathia regains his old form, the Yankees’ 1-2 punch will be hard to match.

As for what he did in Japan: a 99-35 record with a 2.35 ERA and 1,238 strikeouts against 275 walks in 1,315 innings pitched across seven seasons. In 2013 he was 24-0 with a 1.27 ERA and a 183/32 K/BB ratio in 212 innings, leading the Rakuten Golden Eagles to the NPB World Series title.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

Getty Images
1 Comment

Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.