Of course you want to read the pitch for A-Rod: The Movie

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UPDATE: Well, it appears as though the Post has taken the pitch and the story down. Was it b.s.? Was it the next zillion-dollar media project and no one wants it seen yet? NO MAN CAN SAY!

3: 48 PM: Well, it’s not called that. It’s a book pitch, actually, which is simultaneously being shopped to movie producers, as these things tend to happen in package deals. The New York Post has obtained it. It’s from Miami New Times reporter Tim Elfrink, who broke the original Biogenesis story. If you want to read the whole thing, go to the bottom of this post and check it out.

The Post offers the highlights, including stuff about A-Rod using PEDs all the way back to high school. And how the unraveling of Biogenesis — and thus the ruin of A-Rod — can be traced back to Melky Cabrera’s positive PED test in 2012. After that Anthony Bosch lost all of his big money clients (except A-Rod) and started to get into spats with employees and coworkers over money and things and that’s what led to Porter Fischer turning on Bosch and the while thing spilling out into the open.

Most Valuable Melky?

Anyway: I’m guessing this doesn’t get very far. I mean, who plays A-Rod in the movie anyway?

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.