Are the Indians really planning to play Carlos Santana at third base?

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Last week Carlos Santana told Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes that he’s been preparing to play third base regularly this season and expects that to be his primary position following a move from catcher.

Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain Dealer talked to Indians general manager Chris Antonetti, who was slightly less definitive about the situation:

We have not made a decision at third base. That’s what spring training is for. But Carlos has gotten a tremendous head start due to the work he’s put in this offseason. It started with him working at our complex in the Dominican Republic with our coaches. And it transitioned into winter ball.

I think Carlos has approached it that he wants to work as hard as he can to be the best third baseman he can be. … We feel good about our options there. We continue to believe in Lonnie Chisenhall and his potential. And Carlos can only enhance his impact on the team and our goal of becoming a better ball club.

In addition to Lonnie Chisenhall the Indians also have Mike Aviles as an option at third base, so Hoynes speculates that Santana will have to impress during spring training to win the starting job and the position could end up with a time-sharing arrangement of some sort. Meanwhile, the idea that Yan Gomes is now the Indians’ starting catcher seems to be widely accepted by everyone.

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
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The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.