All major league ballparks will require metal detector screening by the 2015 season

56 Comments

Ronald Blum of the Associated Press has the news:

NEW YORK (AP) — Entering a big league ballpark will be a bit like going through an airport by 2015.

Major League Baseball has told its 30 teams they must implement security screening for fans by then, either with hand-held metal detection or walk-through magnetometers.

“This procedure, which results from MLB’s continuing work with the Department of Homeland Security to standardize security practices across the game, will be in addition to bag checks that are now uniform throughout MLB,” baseball spokesman Michael Teevan told the Associated Press on Tuesday. “We conducted testing of these measures at the All-Star game and at both World Series venues last year and were pleased that it was effective and received without issue from fans.”

The Seattle Mariners are going to implement the new screening system this season at Safeco Field.

There haven’t been many instances of weapon violence at baseball stadiums and it’s a shame that such extensive security measures have been deemed necessary, but it’s also understandable that Major League Baseball wants to avoid potential catastrophes. MLB stadiums hold between 35,000 and 56,000 fans.

MLB has more evidence against Addison Russell than just his ex-wife’s blog post

Getty Images
3 Comments

Major League Baseball put Cubs shortstop Addison Russell on administrative leave pursuant to its domestic violence policy the other day. The thought at the time was that the move was made solely because Russell’s ex-wife, Melisa Reidy, had written a blog post reiterating past claims of domestic violence. As Ken Rosenthal reports, however, that’s not all they had:

The post alone would not have been enough for baseball to force Russell off the field under its joint domestic violence policy with the players’ union. The league had additional credible information, according to sources familiar with its investigation.

The league’s investigation includes interviews with Reidy and numerous other witnesses, and with officials gathering additional information since Russell went on leave, sources said.

Reidy’s allegations alone, once assessed by MLB, would likely be enough to warrant Russell a suspension. That there is more out there would seem to make the case against him even stronger. The upshot: I think it’s extraordinarily unlikely that Russell will be back with the Cubs this year.