Reds VP Bob Miller on the arbitration process: “It works poorly”

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The Reds avoided arbitration with starter Mike Leake and relievers Sam LeCure and Alfredo Simon earlier today, but were not able to do so with starter Homer Bailey and flame-throwing closer Aroldis Chapman. As a guest on The C Dot Show earlier, Reds vice president Bob Miller (who handles the arbitration cases for the club) said that the arbitration process “works poorly”.

The full context of the quote, via Jordan Kellogg on Cincinnati.com:

“It works poorly,” Miller said when asked how arbitration works.  ”Someone once said that it’s such a good idea that no other sports league adopted it, so that tells you how good of an idea it is.”

Miller pointed out some incongruity in the salaries of starters and relievers as well. “Here’s the ridiculous part: First-year arbitration-eligible closers make more than the best starting pitchers. … It’s out of whack, it’s a very poor process and we muddle through it.”

He’s not exactly wrong. Braves closer Craig Kimbrel filed for $9 million, which is the third-highest reported amount that we know of so far. A $9 million salary would be the sixth-highest among all arbitration-eligible players this off-season, behind Max Scherzer ($15.525 million), David Price ($14 million), Chase Headley ($10.525 million), Chris Davis ($10.35 million), and Jim Johnson ($10 million). It would rank ahead of Rick Porcello ($8.5 million) and Kyle Kendrick ($7.675 million).

Indians designate Carlos Gonzalez for assignment

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The Indians have designated outfielder Carlos Gonzalez for assignment. This comes after Gonzalez batted a mere .210/.282/.276 over 117 plate appearances in Cleveland. That came after he had to settle for a minor league contract with the Indians in mid-March.

A few years ago Gonzalez was a superstar, winning three Gold Gloves, two Silver Slugger Awards, making the All-Star team three times and coming in third in the MVP balloting once upon a time. That was then, however. His most recent good season came in 2016, when he hit .298/.350/.505 with 25 homers and drove in 100. In 2017 and 2018 he combined to hit .232/.269/.334. Between his falloff in production and the fact that his big numbers of the past were heavily supported by playing at Coors Field, it should not be shocking that he couldn’t make it work in Cleveland.

If he wants to continue his career, he’ll no doubt have to take a minor league gig someplace. Otherwise, this could be the end of the line.