40 players exchange figures with their clubs following today’s deadline

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There was a flurry of arbitration-related news today as players and teams scurried to reach agreements prior to the noon central deadline earlier. 39 players did not reach an agreement with their respective teams, and as such, they have exchanged salary figures with their clubs. Of note, Braves closer Craig Kimbrel filed for $9 million, which is a lot of money for a closer in his first year of arbitration eligibility. The Braves filed for $6.55 million while most experts projected Kimbrel to get around $7 million.

Here’s the full list of players, broken down by team:

Angels (2)

  • David Freese (3B) filed for $6M, team filed for $4.1M (source)
  • Kevin Jepsen (RP) filed for $1.625M, team filed for $1.3M (source)

Athletics (1)

  • Josh Reddick (OF) filed for $3.25M, team filed for $2M (source)

Braves (3)

  • Craig Kimbrel (RP) filed for $9M, team filed for $6.55M (source)
  • Freddie Freeman (1B) filed for $5.75M, team filed for $4.5M (source)
  • Jason Heyward (RF) filed for $5.5M, team filed for $5.2M (source)

Cardinals (1)

  • Daniel Descalso (IF) filed for $1.65M, team filed for $930,000 (source)

Cubs (4)

  • Darwin Barney (2B) filed for $2.8M, team filed for $1.8M
  • Jeff Samardzija (SP) filed for $6.2M, team filed for $4.4M
  • Justin Ruggiano (CF) filed for $2.45M, team filed for $1.6M
  • Travis Wood (SP) filed for $4.25M, team filed for $3.5M (source for all four)

Diamondbacks (2)

  • Gerardo Parra (OF) filed for $5.2M, team filed for $4.3M (source)
  • Mark Trumbo (LF) filed for $5.85M, team filed for $3.4M (source)

Dodgers (2)

  • A.J. Ellis (C) filed for $4.6M, team filed for $3M (source)
  • Kenley Jansen (RP) filed for $5.05M, team filed for $3.5M (source)

Giants (2)

  • Brandon Belt (1B) filed for $3.6M, team filed for $2.05M (source)
  • Joaquin Arias (IF) filed for $1.5M, team filed for $1.1M (source)

Indians (4)

  • Josh Tomlin (SP) filed for $975,000, team filed for $800,000
  • Justin Masterson (SP) filed for $11.8M, team filed for $8.05M
  • Michael Brantley (LF) filed for $3.8M, team filed for $2.7M
  • Vinnie Pestano (RP) filed for $1.45M, team filed for $975,000 (source for all four)

Mariners (2)

  • Justin Smoak (1B) filed for $3.25M, team filed for $2.025M
  • Logan Morrison (RF) filed for $2.5M, team filed for $1.1M (source for both)

Mets (2)

  • Dillon Gee (SP) filed for $4.05M, team filed for $3.2M (source)
  • Lucas Duda (1B/LF) filed for $1.9M, team filed for $1.35M (source)

Nationals (2)

  • Doug Fister (SP) filed for $8.5M, team filed for $5.75M (source)
  • Tyler Clippard (RP) filed for $6.35M, team filed for $4.45M (source)

Orioles (1)

  • Matt Wieters (C) filed for $8.75M, team filed for $6.5M (source)

Padres (1)

  • Andrew Cashner (SP) filed for $2.4M, team filed for $2.275M (source)

Phillies (2)

  • Ben Revere (CF) filed for $2.425M, team filed for $1.4M (source)
  • Antonio Bastardo (RP) filed for $2.5M, team filed for $1.675M (source)

Rangers (1)

  • Mitch Moreland (1B/DH) filed for $3.25M, team filed for $2.025M (source)

Red Sox (1)

  • Andrew Miller (RP) filed for $2.15M, team filed for $1.55M (source)

Reds (2)

  • Aroldis Chapman (RP) filed for $5.4M, team filed for $4.6M (source)
  • Homer Bailey (SP) filed for $11.6M, team filed for $8.7M (source)

Royals (3)

  • Aaron Crow (RP) filed for $1.7M, team filed for $1.28M (source)
  • Greg Holland (RP) filed for $5.2M, team filed for $4.1M (source)
  • Justin Maxwell (OF) filed for $1.7M, team filed for $1.075M (source)

Tigers (1)

  • Alex Avila (C) filed for $5.35M, team filed for $3.75M (source)

Players and teams can still reach agreements to avoid arbitration between now and when hearings start on February 1st. However, some teams simply don’t negotiate once the filing deadline passes. The Braves are one of them, as David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. GM Frank Wren said, “We have an organization philosophy of the filing date is our last date to negotiate prior to a hearing. We’re done.”

Last year, exactly zero cases went to arbitration for the first time in baseball history.

Yankees trade Sonny Gray to the Reds

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The deal was much talked about all weekend and now the deal is done: The Cincinnati Reds gave acquired starter Sonny Gray and lefty Reiver Sanmartin from the Yankees in exchange for second base prospect Shed Long and a 2019 competitive balance pick.

The key to making the deal happen: Gray agreeing to a a three-year, $30.5 million contract extension. The Reds will likewise hold a $12 million club option for 2023. The deal had been struck and a window granted through close of business today to get Gray to agree to the extension and, obviously, he has.

The Reds will get a pitcher coming off of a bad season in which he posted a disappointing 4.90 ERA in 23 starts and seven relief appearances. He was hammered particularly hard in Yankee Stadium but pitched better on the road. Great American Ballpark is not a great pitcher’s park itself but any change of scenery would be nice for Gray, who had become much unwanted and unloved in New York. In Cincinnati he has the assurance of a spot in the rotation and, even better for him, he will be reunited with his college pitching coach, Derek Johnson, who joined new manager David Bell’s Reds staff earlier this offseason. If he bounces back even a little bit, the Reds will have a useful starter at a below market price for four years. If he doesn’t, well, they haven’t exactly gone bankrupt taking the chance.

The Reds will also get Reiver Sanmartin, 22, who started in the Rangers system before being traded to the Yankees. He’s a soft-tosser who figures to be a reliever if he makes the big leagues. He played at four different levels last season, with one game at Double-A and the rest below that, posting a composite 2.80 ERA in 10 starts and 13 overall appearances while striking out 7.8 batters per nine.

The Yankees will get Shed Long, who is ranked as the Reds’ seventh best prospect. The 23-year old second baseman hit .261/.353/.412 at Double-A in 2018 and has hit very close to that overall line for his entire six-year minor league career. He strikes out a bit and may not stick at second base long term, shifting to a corner outfield slot perhaps, but he’s a legitimate prospect.

The Reds get another starter with some upside. The Yankees get rid of a problem and gain a prospect and a draft pick. Sonny Gray gets some job and financial security at a time when it is not at all clear what his future holds. Not a bad baseball trade.

UPDATE: Welp, the Yankees don’t have a prospect anymore. They just traded long to the Mariners for outfielder Josh Stowers. Stowers was a second-round pick in last year’s draft. He’s 21 and batted .260/.380/.410 with five homers and 20 steals over 58 games in Short-Season ball in 2018. He’s ranked by MLB.com as the Mariners’ No. 10 prospect, but now he’s New York bound.