If you have $5,000 and faith in the Astros, you could be a millionaire

27 Comments

Nick Mathews of the Houston Chronicle tweets that the Astros have the odds stacked against them to win the World Series in 2014 — 200-to-1 odds, in fact. Saving us from having to do the math ($1,000,000/200), he adds that if you wager $5,000 on the Astros to win it all and they do, you’ll end up a millionaire.

Snicker all you want, but longer odds have paid off in recent history. On September 12, 2011, the Cardinals were 500-to-1 to win the National League pennant, and 999-to-1 to win the World Series. A fan in Las Vegas put $250 on both at the MGM grand. As the Cardinals vanquished the Phillies in five games in the NLDS, cut through the Brewers in six in the NLCS, and toppled the Rangers in seven in the World Series, that fan walked away with $125,000 for the pennant wager and $249,750 on the World Series wager for a total of $374,750.

If you have fifty $100 bills  laying around that you were going to throw in the shredder or use to line the bird cage, why not bet on the Astros instead? You may end up looking like a genius.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
1 Comment

Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.