How many scouts actually played pro ball?

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Here’s an interesting column from Conor Glassey over at Baseball Prospectus: he looks into how many baseball scouts actually played professional baseball.

I had no idea. If you had asked me before I read the story I might have said, oh, I dunno, 75%. On the basis that who is better to recognize a good pitch or a good hitting approach than someone who actually had one or was at least trained to have one. But the number is not 75% — go read the story to see the real number — and the number varies greatly depending on which organization’s scouts you look at too, which Conor breaks down.

A good takeaway comes here:

It all comes down to judging talent, regardless of your background . . . Most of the famous music executives didn’t have successful careers as musicians. That’s true for John Hammond, a talent scout with Columbia Records, who is credited with discovering and/or signing Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Billie Holliday, Leonard Cohen, and Stevie Ray Vaughan, among others. Lorne Michaels wasn’t a famous comedian, but as the creator of Saturday Night Live he has put his stamp of approval on a huge percentage of the people responsible for laughs you’ve likely enjoyed over the years.

Scouting works the same way.

I think that applies to baseball analysis and broadcasting too. Yet, for some reason, “you never played the game” is a pretty common retort from players who just got criticized and the single best predictor of who shows up as a talking head on ESPN, MLB Network, Fox and ESPN is whether or not they were a big leaguer.

Oh well.

Brewers to give Mike Moustakas a look at second base

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The Brewers reportedly signed third baseman Mike Moustakas to a one-year, $10 million contract on Sunday. While the deal is not yet official, MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy reports that the Brewers plan to give Moustakas a look at second base during spring training. If all goes well, he will be the primary second baseman and Travis Shaw will stay at third base.

The initial thought was that Moustakas would simply take over at third base for the more versatile Shaw. Moustakas has spent 8,035 of his career defensive innings at third base, 35 innings at first base, and none at second. In fact, he has never played second base as a pro player. Shaw, meanwhile, has spent 268 of his 4,073 1/3 defensive innings in the majors at second base and played there as recently as October.

This is certainly an interesting wrinkle to signing Moustakas, who is a decent third baseman. He was victimized by another slow free agent market, not signing until March last year on a $6.5 million deal with a $15 million mutual option for this season. That option was declined, obviously, and he ended up signing for $5 million cheaper here in February as the Brewers waited him out. Notably, Moustakas did not have qualifying offer compensation attached to him this time around.

Last season, between the Royals and Brewers, the 30-year-old Moustakas hit .251/.315/.459 with 28 home runs and 95 RBI in 635 plate appearances.