Blue Jays said to be “leading candidates” for either Ervin Santana or Ubaldo Jimenez

58 Comments

The great Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com shares this scoop:

The Blue Jays, quiet for much of the offseason, still figure to acquire one and possibly two starting pitchers once the logjam caused by [Masahiro] Tanaka starts to resolve.

The Jays are a leading candidate to sign either [Ervin] Santana or [Ubaldo] Jimenez; they have two protected first-round picks, Nos. 9 and 11, and would sacrifice only a second-rounder and the accompanying pool money for one of those free-agent right-handers.

Toronto had a 4.25 staff ERA in 2013, which ranked 25th in MLB. There has been very little talk of a run at Tanaka, who could get over $100 million guaranteed, but the Jays are poised to chase the next best thing once that chip falls into place.

Santana, 31, posted a 3.24 ERA and 1.14 WHIP in 32 starts last year for the Royals, fanning 161 batters in 211 innings. Jimenez, 29, had a 3.30 ERA, 1.33 WHIP and 194 strikeouts in 182 2/3 frames for Cleveland.

The Blue Jays’ three locked-in starters for 2014 are R.A. Dickey, Mark Buehrle and Brandon Morrow.

J.A. Happ could win a spot and there’s still some shred of hope for 26-year-old righty Kyle Drabek.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.