Murray Chass is keeping his Hall of Fame vote to spite me specifically

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Really, it’s true. Noted unemployed blogger Murray Chass promised last year that he would cease voting for the Hall of Fame after this year. That his sole reason for one last vote would be to get Jack Morris in, then he would relinquish his ballot for all time. But he got mad that Rob Neyer and I called him out for his baseless accusations of steroid use by Craig Biggio, so now he’s going to spite us:

Finally, an announcement that will disappoint Neyer, Calcaterra and the reader who, like those two bloggers, said they were delighted that this was the last time I would be voting for the Hall of Fame. Sorry, guys I never made it definite.

I said “barring a change in my thinking,” this could be my last vote. My thinking has changed, and all of you critics can blame yourselves. How could I relinquish my vote knowing how much it annoys you? I plan to vote a year from now even if I just send in a blank ballot. You would love that.

The rest of his blog post revolves around (a) lecturing me about how to be proper journalist; and (b) citing another person’s statement that, while they are unwilling to share the basis for it, they personally believe Biggio did steroids as evidence that Biggio did steroids. I see no disconnect there.

Oh well. Don’t go gentle into that good night, Murray. Burn and rave at close of day. With the approving imprimatur of the Baseball Writers Association of America.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.