Dan Shaughnessy clearly doesn’t give a crap about his Hall of Fame ballot

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As I’ve noted several times, my Hall of Fame thing isn’t necessarily voters getting “the right ballot.” It’s just about having an actual coherent philosophy and approach and maintaining some level of intellectual consistency about yourself. For example, Ken Rosenthal and I differ sharply about PED users in the Hall of Fame, but his Hall of Fame ballot is still rigorous and defensible and consistent with his stated beliefs despite looking pretty different from my hypothetical ballot. I’m accused of being Hall of Fame Thought Police, but all I really ask is that you not be a blithering idiot about it.

Here’s a good example of how that all works: Noted idiot Dan Shaughnessy blithered his Hall of Fame ballot over the weekend. My stomach is not strong enough to get into it blow-by-blow, but Jason Collette gave it a good going-over. It’s worth your time, if for no other reason than the insane level of slapdashery on display.

This year Shaugnessy voted for Jack Morris, Curt Schilling, Frank Thomas, Tom Glavine, and Greg Maddux. That leaves five empty slots, suggesting that he does not believe anyone else on the ballot is worthy. Which would be fine if it wasn’t for the fact that, as Collette notes, Shaughnessy voted for Jack Morris, Tim Raines, Alan Trammell, and Curt Schilling last year.

Why no Raines and Trammell this year? It’s not because they got crowded out — there’s plenty of room left on Shaughnessy’s ballot — it’s because Shaugnessy doesn’t give enough of a crap about his vote to even look at what he did last year or to maintain even a shred of intellectual consistency about it. For all of the stuff we hear from writers about the honor and responsibility of a Hall of Fame vote and for all of the stuff we hear about how much they agonize over such an important task, one of the most noted sportswriters of the past 30 years dashes his ballot the hell off in about five minutes.

What a process.

Report: Padres have discussed trading Wil Myers for Mariners’ Jean Segura and Mike Leake

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Padres have discussed with the Mariners a potential trade in which outfielder Wil Myers would head to Seattle in exchange for shortstop Jean Segura and starter Mike Leake. Leake would need to waive his no-trade clause in order to make the deal work.

Myers has four years and $64 million remaining on his contract with a $20 million club option for 2023 as well. Segura has four years and $58 million remaining with a $17 million club option for 2023. Leake is under contract for two more years with $36 million remaining as well as an $18 million mutual option for 2021.

This past season, Myers battled elbow, oblique, and foot injuries last season, limiting him to 83 games and 343 plate appearances. He hit .253/.318/.446 with 11 home runs, 39 RBI, 39 runs scored, and 13 stolen bases. Myers played all over the field for the Padres, spending time at third base and both outfield corners as well as first base and a brief inning in center. If Myers were to go to Seattle, he would likely handle first base on a full-time basis.

2018 marked an All-Star campaign for Segura, who hit .304/.341/.415 with 10 home runs, 63 RBI, 91 runs scored, and 20 stolen bases in 632 plate appearances. Baseball Reference tallies him at 13 WAR over the last three seasons, so he would certainly be an impact player for the Padres. Rosenthal suggests Segura could handle shortstop for the Padres until top prospect Fernando Tatis, Jr. is ready. Segura would then move to second base. Alternatively, Tatis could potentially move to third base.

Leake, 31, is essentially a throw-in player in the deal. This past season, the right-hander put up middling numbers, finishing 10-10 with a 4.36 ERA and a 119/34 K/BB ratio in 185 2/3 innings. He would have no problem slotting into the Padres’ rotation.

Rosenthal takes care to point out that this suggested deal is not believed to be close, but it is notable that such a swap is being considered. On Monday, the Mariners traded starter James Paxton to the Yankees. The Mariners are believed to be setting their sights further down the line to be competitive. It could become a full-blown rebuilding effort. It’s a shame because the Mariners had a solid 2018, finishing 89-73, but they finished 14 games behind the Astros and were even eight games behind the second-place Athletics. The way front offices approach competing these days, finishing above .500 but out of the postseason isn’t good enough.