It’s “Oh, how heavy a burden it is to vote for the Hall of Fame” season

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I think my least favorite type of baseball columns are the ones in which the writer talks about the heavy, heavy burden of his Hall of Fame vote. We’re baseball writers for Pete’s sake. We’re not making life or death decisions. Not that you’d know it from some of these pieces, though. Check out Steve Simmons’ heavy, heavy burden:

Every year seems to get more difficult, more complicated, more conflicted and less certain about voting for the Baseball Hall of Fame and every year I make a list and scratch names off it, then make another list and do the same again. All the while, wrestling with what you perceive to be right and wrong, what your own beliefs happens to be, angry that baseball has left the writers to play the part of jury and all the while trying to find balance between what you believe, what you witnessed, what you think you know, what prejudices you may have, real or imagined, what you have determined statistically — with new stats and old stats.

What follows are several paragraphs of PED/Hall of Fame/Oh-my-this-is-so-morally-vexing wankery. After which Simmons decides that he can’t vote for PED guys for the Hall of Fame. Which is fine if that’s how you roll with the PED issue. I disagree with it, but as long as someone is consistent with their approach and doesn’t make baseless assumptions and crap, all I’ll do is disagree. It won’t get me too bent out of shape.

But what I really don’t get is, if you are an anti-PED voter, what’s so hard about this? If anything, it should be pretty easy. You’ve made a moral judgment, apply it. All of the self-flagellation about it seems like silly drama designed to fill column inches.

Report: Aaron Judge, Yankees reach 9-year, $360M deal

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SAN DIEGO — Aaron Judge has agreed to return to the New York Yankees on a nine-year, $360 million contract, according to a person familiar with the deal.

The person spoke to The Associated Press because the deal had not been announced.

Judge will earn $40 million per season, the highest average annual payout for a position player. The contract trails only Mike Trout’s $426.5 million deal with the Los Angeles Angels and Mookie Betts’ $365 million pact with the Los Angeles Dodgers for biggest in baseball history.

Judge was offered a long-term deal by New York before last season that was worth $213.5 million over seven years from 2023-29. But he turned it down in the hours before opening day in April.

The 6-foot-7 Judge bet on himself — and won.

Judge set an American League record with 62 homers in 2022, powering the Yankees to the AL East title. He also tied for the major league lead with 131 RBIs and just missed a Triple Crown with a .311 batting average.

New York was swept by Houston in the AL Championship Series, but Judge became the first AL MVP for the Yankees since Alex Rodriguez in 2007.

Judge, 30, was selected by New York in the first round of the 2013 amateur draft and made his big league debut in 2016, homering in his first at-bat.

A year later, he was one of baseball’s breakout stars. He hit .284 with 52 homers and 114 RBIs in 2017, winning the AL Rookie of the Year award. The four-time All-Star has 220 homers and 497 RBIs in seven big league seasons.