The Rays are in no rush to trade David Price

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After the Mariners signed second baseman Robinson Cano to a ten-year, $240 million contract two weeks ago, many predicted that the next shoe to drop would be a trade with the Rays for David Price. But reports indicated that the Rays would only let go of the left-hander if the Mariners included Taijuan Walker in the deal, and talks stagnated. Since then, the Rays haven’t been in any rush to offload their ace.

Via Mark Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times:

That could change — if not in the next couple of weeks that typically are quiet in baseball than in January — as teams, some that have talked to the Rays and some that maybe have not, reassess needs and options, perhaps with more desperation. Resolution of Japanese pitcher Masahiro Tanaka’s status is a factor; if he isn’t available, that should increase the demand for Price (as well as remaining free agents Matt Garza, Ubaldo Jimenez, Ervin Santana) because there would be one fewer frontline starter to be had.

But there is no deadline, no drop-dead date by which the Rays have to make a deal or tell Price he isn’t being traded.

Price is eligible for free agency after the 2015 season. He earned just over $10 million in 2013 and will earn significant raises over each of the next two seasons, which may motivate the Rays to trade him sooner rather than later. The Rays currently have just under $40 million committed to ten players and have operated with an Opening Day payroll between $61-64 million over the last two years.

The Giants are considering Pablo Sandoval at second base

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Pablo Sandoval could be tabbed to play second base in the near future, per a report from John Shea of the San Francisco Chronicle. According to Shea, Sandoval has been spotted taking grounders at second during pre-game warm-ups and may be considering switching to the keystone on a part-time basis.

It wouldn’t be the weirdest thing the 31-year-old corner infielder has done this year — that distinction goes to the flawless inning of relief he pitched in a blowout loss against the Dodgers last month. But it would represent a pretty notable departure from his comfort zone even so; Sandoval has primarily manned first and third base throughout his 11-year career in the majors and has also taken a few reps at DH during his resurgence with the Giants in 2018.

Of course, this wouldn’t necessarily be a permanent switch for Sandoval. As Shea points out, the Giants are thin on middle infielders after losing Joe Panik to a torn UCL in his left thumb and backup Alen Hanson to a left hamstring strain. Provided he can get up to speed quickly (no easy feat, according to infield coach Ron Wotus), he’d give the club some added depth behind Kelby Tomlinson and Miguel Gomez until Panik is ready to take the field again. Sandoval has impressed at the plate this spring, batting a healthy .270/.329/.429 with six extra-base hits and a .757 through 70 plate appearances.