Court rules that MLB can depose Yuri Sucart in its pointless lawsuit

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Major League Baseball sought to depose Alex Rodriguez‘s cousin Yuri Sucart in the lawsuit it filed against Biogenesis and lots of other folks. That is, the lawsuit which gave Major League Baseball the handle with which to turn Anthony Bosch and others as it pursued Rodriguez, Ryan Braun and other ballplayers. Over the summer Sucart filed a writ with a Florida appellate court challenging the validity of the lawsuit and seeking an order preventing the deposition from taking place. That effort was denied and he filed an appeal with Florida’s Third District Court of Appeal. He lost that appeal today, so that’s pretty much the end of the road in his effort. MLB can now take his deposition.

Of course, why they’d even want to take his deposition now is an open question. The MLBPA and all of the accused players with the exception of Alex Rodriguez got on board with baseball’s Biogenesis investigation, accepting their punishment. With respect to Rodriguez, the evidence Major League Baseball used against him was obtained months ago and the arbitration is now closed. Making Sucart sit for a deposition seems rather pointless, as does the enitre lawsuit.

My guess: MLB is trying to lay the groundwork for the future. For the next time it wants to use the court system to coerce cooperation from people over which it doesn’t have authority. To vindicate, as much as possible, a legal theory that I and many others to be profoundly troublesome and legally unsound but which, for some reason, the Florida courts have gone along with for months. So MLB can say later “we did it once, we’ll do it again.”

But hey, what’s a little pointless waste of the legal system between friends?

Mariano Rivera elected to Baseball Hall of Fame unanimously

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Former Yankees closer Mariano Rivera deservingly became the first player ever inducted into the Hall of Fame unanimously, receiving votes from all 425 writers who submitted ballots. Previously, the closest players to unanimous induction were Ken Griffey, Jr. (99.32% in 2016), Tom Seaver (98.84% in 1992), Nolan Ryan (98.79% in 1999), Cal Ripken, Jr. (98.53%), Ty Cobb (98.23% in 1936), and George Brett (98.19% in 1999).

Because so many greats were not enshrined in Cooperstown unanimously, many voters in the past argued against other players getting inducted unanimously, withholding their votes for otherwise deserving players. That Griffey — both one of the greatest outfielders of all time and one of the most popular players of all time — wasn’t voted in unanimously in 2016, for example, seemed to signal that no player ever would. Now that Rivera has been, this tired argument about voting unanimity can be laid to rest.

Derek Jeter will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time next year. He may become the second player ever to be elected unanimously. David Ortiz appears on the 2022 ballot and could be No. 3. Now that Rivera has broken through, these are possibilities whereas before they might not have been.

Another tired argument around Hall of Fame voting concerns whether or not a player is a “first ballot” Hall of Famer. Some voters think getting enshrined in a player’s first year of eligibility is a greater honor than getting in any subsequent year. I’m not sure what it will take to get rid of this argument — other than the electorate getting younger and more open-minded — but at least we have made progress on at least one bad Hall of Fame take.