The Billy Beane Hall of Fame fight is gonna be a load of fun, isn’t it?

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Richard Justice has a good column up about Billy Beane today. He notes Beane’s role as a transformative figure and how, despite the fact that every GM this side of Ruben Amaro has followed Beane’s approach — and despite the fact most of them have more money to work with than he does — Beane’s A’s still compete and even thrive.

Justice upped the ante a bit in a tweet promoting his column:

 

I could get on board with that. I think Sandy Alderson should maybe get more credit, as he taught Beane what he knows about exploiting hidden value, looking to analytics such as OBP over traditional ones and all of that, but Beane certainly is the poster boy for the sabermetric revolution in baseball front offices.

But man, I can’t help but think that a Hall of Fame debate about Billy Beane is gonna be a bloodbath. Scores of Hall of Fame voters, be they veterans committee types or otherwise, have spent years decrying and, even more often, misrepresenting sabermetrics.  If you think the august group of Hall of Fame voters is gonna credit Billy Beane the way Justice and I think he should be credited, well, I got a a bunch of bridges to sell you.

Marlins unveil what they’re putting in the space where the home run sculpture used to be

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. In October they announced that it would, in fact, be moving out to a plaza or the parking lot or someplace you’re unlikely to ever see it because who goes to Marlins games?

Today we got a tease of what the Marlins are doing with the space the sculpture is vacating:

It was only a matter of time before that green wall went away. There are a lot of things I like about the overall aesthetic of Marlins Park, but almost all of them are because of their novelty. Jeff Loria was bad for a lot of reasons, but one of the few good things he did was eschew nostalgia and traditionalism with the ballpark. Nostalgia and traditionalism, unfortunately, is the straw that stirs baseball’s drink, so any “weird” colors or flourishes were gonna be beat out of that place as the years went on. It was inevitable.

As for the “three-tier social space,” here’s hoping that tickets for it are cheap or the Marlins start winning ballgames soon, because the Marlins can’t really fill their existing spectator spaces now.