Pete Rose upset home plate collisions will be eliminated from Major League Baseball

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You probably could have predicted this. Via the great Hal McCoy of the Dayton Daily News:

A GOOD FRIEND, Mark Fisher of Bloomington, Ind., sent my an e-mail and asked, “What would Pete Rose say about MLB wanting to eliminate collisions at home plate?”

That’s a great question, so I called Rose. As you might expect, he had more than a few syllables to say about the subject.

“First of all, if they can eliminate concussions, I’m all for that,” said Rose. “But I’ve thought and thought about it. The only concussions I can remember recently in baseball is Justin Morneau, and he got that sliding into second base. I know this is mostly about Buster Posey, but he got hurt when he got his ankle caught and twisted it.”

SO, YES, ROSE is against eliminating home plate collisions.

“I’m a traditionalist,” he said. “I thought the game has always been pretty good. About the only major changes they’ve made to the game since 1869 was when they lowered the mound afrter the 1968 season and the designated hitter. I mean, the game is going pretty good, isn’t it?

“What’s next? Are they going to eliminate the takeout slide on double plays at second base?” Rose asked.

Johnny Bench is all for the new rule, which was first announced at last week’s Winter Meetings in Orlando, Florida, and is only awaiting approval from the players’ union. That approval is expected to come soon.

Rose inflicted a major shoulder injury on catcher Ray Fosse when he plowed into him at home plate during the 1970 All-Star Game. “I had nothing against Fosse,” Rose told McCoy this weekend. “I had him over to my house the night before the game, but to this day he denies that. And he won’t do autographs shows with me and still says I deliberately tried to end his career. If that was my intent, I sure did a terrible job of it.”

Report: Yankees acquire Edwin Encarnación from Mariners

Edwin Encarnacion
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The Mariners are in the midst of reconstructing their roster, a process which most recently resulted in the trade of first baseman/DH Edwin Encarnación to the Yankees, per a report from ESPN’s Jeff Passan. While the teams have yet to publicly confirm the deal, the Mariners are expected to receive pitching prospect Juan Then and will likely eat a significant portion of Encarnación’s salary as well.

Encarnación is a sizable get for the Yankees, who could benefit from the veteran’s power and consistency in their ongoing drive toward the postseason. The 36-year-old infielder missed some time with a bout of lower back tightness, dental issues, and soreness in his left hand, but has still maintained a decent .241/.356/.531 batting line with an AL-best 21 home runs, an .888 OPS, and 1.7 fWAR through his first 289 plate appearances of the year. Per Mark Feinsand of MLB.com, Encarnación has another $11-12 million left on his contract in 2019, with a $20 million option for the 2020 season and a $5 million buyout.

Then, 19, was acquired by the Yankees in a three-person trade with the Mariners during the 2017 offseason. The right-hander currently ranks no. 27 in the Yankees’ system and made his last pro ball appearance for New York’s rookie-level affiliate in 2018, pitching to a 2.70 ERA, 2.0 BB/9, and 7.6 SO/9 across 50 innings. It’s not clear if any other players are involved in the trade, though USA Today’s Bob Nightengale notes that no other prospects are thought to be included in the package for Encarnación.