Pete Rose upset home plate collisions will be eliminated from Major League Baseball

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You probably could have predicted this. Via the great Hal McCoy of the Dayton Daily News:

A GOOD FRIEND, Mark Fisher of Bloomington, Ind., sent my an e-mail and asked, “What would Pete Rose say about MLB wanting to eliminate collisions at home plate?”

That’s a great question, so I called Rose. As you might expect, he had more than a few syllables to say about the subject.

“First of all, if they can eliminate concussions, I’m all for that,” said Rose. “But I’ve thought and thought about it. The only concussions I can remember recently in baseball is Justin Morneau, and he got that sliding into second base. I know this is mostly about Buster Posey, but he got hurt when he got his ankle caught and twisted it.”

SO, YES, ROSE is against eliminating home plate collisions.

“I’m a traditionalist,” he said. “I thought the game has always been pretty good. About the only major changes they’ve made to the game since 1869 was when they lowered the mound afrter the 1968 season and the designated hitter. I mean, the game is going pretty good, isn’t it?

“What’s next? Are they going to eliminate the takeout slide on double plays at second base?” Rose asked.

Johnny Bench is all for the new rule, which was first announced at last week’s Winter Meetings in Orlando, Florida, and is only awaiting approval from the players’ union. That approval is expected to come soon.

Rose inflicted a major shoulder injury on catcher Ray Fosse when he plowed into him at home plate during the 1970 All-Star Game. “I had nothing against Fosse,” Rose told McCoy this weekend. “I had him over to my house the night before the game, but to this day he denies that. And he won’t do autographs shows with me and still says I deliberately tried to end his career. If that was my intent, I sure did a terrible job of it.”

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.