Robinson Cano, Yankees trade barbs about “disrespect”

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The divorce is over and each of them has found a new love, but Robinson Cano and the Yankees have still decided it’s worth trading barbs about “disrespect” in the past 24 hours.

Here’s Robinson Cano at yesterday’s press conference when asked about his dealings with the Yankees before accepting the Mariners’ $240 million offer:

“I didn’t feel respect. I didn’t get respect from them . . . I was hoping they would come up with a better offer. My goal was to stay there . . . I didn’t see any effort [from the Yankees].”

Know what? I get that. Cano is absolutely wrong for talking publicly about it and doing so gets him absolutely nowhere, but I understand why he may feel that way. The Yankees didn’t even really pretend to be particularly interested. Not saying they should have been — at the price Cano was reportedly demanding it made no sense for New York — but there has developed a certain convention around such high-profile athletes in which everyone at least publicly talks about how badly they want to stay together, etc. and that didn’t happen here. And star athletes are high strung and all of that. So, again, Cano shouldn’t have said this, but I can see where it’s coming from.

Just this morning Yankees President Randy Levine shot back, taking issue with Cano’s claim that the Yankees did not treat him with respect. He said they were more than happy to make a $175 million offer and always treated Cano with respect, but that ultimately it was simply a matter of it not making any kind of sense for the Yankees to commit to a ten-year contract given how those deals have gone for them in the past. He doesn’t blame Cano for taking Seattle’s offer as it was clearly better. Levine added that, rather than disrespect, he thinks Robinson Cano is “very disappointed” he no longer plays for the Yankees.

Now: everyone move on.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

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Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.