Robinson Cano, Yankees trade barbs about “disrespect”

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The divorce is over and each of them has found a new love, but Robinson Cano and the Yankees have still decided it’s worth trading barbs about “disrespect” in the past 24 hours.

Here’s Robinson Cano at yesterday’s press conference when asked about his dealings with the Yankees before accepting the Mariners’ $240 million offer:

“I didn’t feel respect. I didn’t get respect from them . . . I was hoping they would come up with a better offer. My goal was to stay there . . . I didn’t see any effort [from the Yankees].”

Know what? I get that. Cano is absolutely wrong for talking publicly about it and doing so gets him absolutely nowhere, but I understand why he may feel that way. The Yankees didn’t even really pretend to be particularly interested. Not saying they should have been — at the price Cano was reportedly demanding it made no sense for New York — but there has developed a certain convention around such high-profile athletes in which everyone at least publicly talks about how badly they want to stay together, etc. and that didn’t happen here. And star athletes are high strung and all of that. So, again, Cano shouldn’t have said this, but I can see where it’s coming from.

Just this morning Yankees President Randy Levine shot back, taking issue with Cano’s claim that the Yankees did not treat him with respect. He said they were more than happy to make a $175 million offer and always treated Cano with respect, but that ultimately it was simply a matter of it not making any kind of sense for the Yankees to commit to a ten-year contract given how those deals have gone for them in the past. He doesn’t blame Cano for taking Seattle’s offer as it was clearly better. Levine added that, rather than disrespect, he thinks Robinson Cano is “very disappointed” he no longer plays for the Yankees.

Now: everyone move on.

Nick Markakis leads all NL outfielders in All-Star voting

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I would hope by now that I no longer have to preface All-Star talk with my usual “none of this matters” disclaimers, but please keep all of that in mind when I mention that Nick Markakis is leading all National League outfielders in All-Star voting.

Markakis, with 1,173,653 votes, has surpassed the slumping Bryce Harper in that category. Harper has 1,002,696 votes. The third place outfielder is Matt Kemp of the Dodgers with 925,697. Fourth place — Charlie Blackmon of the Dodgers — is like 300,000 votes back of Kemp.Yes, Markakis, Harper and Kemp may be the starting NL outfield. Brandon Nimmo — not on the ballot — should be grumpy, but he’ll get his chance I’m sure.

The thing about it: Markakis, for as unexpected as his appearance may be on this list, deserves to at least be in the top three. He’s second in WAR among National League outfielders behind Lorenzo Cain. He’s slowed down a good bit in June and he’s coming off of a 2017 season in which he had a 96 OPS+ and 0.7 WAR, but he’s having quite an outstanding season. I write that mostly so that there is a record of it come October and we’ve all forgotten it.

Seriously, though, good for Markakis, who has never made an All-Star Game. Good for Kemp too for that matter, who most people assumed was a walking — well, limping — corpse heading into this season. Good for Harper because anything that can keep up the guise of him having a good year when, in reality, he’s really not, will help his confidence as he heads into free agency.

Finally, good for the American League, who will likely get to face a far, far inferior National League team next month in Washington.

The rest of the voting: