MLB still trying to get evidence that A-Rod obstructed the Biogenesis investigation

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Alex Rodriguez’s P.R. guy, Michael Sitrick, was allegedly served with a subpoena by Major League Baseball. They wanted him to testify in the arbitration as to whether he or his underlings leaked Biogenesis documents implicating Ryan Braun and Francisco Cervelli to the press. MLB believes that he did, and by doing so A-Rod — through his rep — impeded the Biogenesis investigation, thereby requiring that A-Rod receive a greater suspension than everyone else.

Problem: Sitrick did not appear to testify and the arbitration is now closed. And, as Rich Calder of the New York Post reports, MLB and Sitrick are fighting the matter of his subpoena out in court, with MLB trying to reopen the arbitration to get his testimony in.

Lots of legal things in there that are of interest to some of you, but the bigger take here: if Major League Baseball is frantically trying to get evidence of A-Rod’s obstruction after the arbitration is closed, how strong could their obstruction case as presented in the arbitration actually be? And if it’s not strong, what possible basis is there for a suspension more than four-times greater than that provided by the Joint Drug Agreement?

I’d guess that the evidence that A-Rod did something wrong, thereby justifying a suspension of some sort is pretty good as it compares to all of the other players who got 50-65 game suspensions out of all of this. But the case for over 200 games sounds like the weakest sauce imaginable.

Red Sox to activate Dustin Pedroia from disabled list on Friday

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Manager Alex Cora said that second baseman Dustin Pedroia will be activated from the disabled list on Friday, Pete Abraham of The Boston Globe reports.

Pedroia, 34, had cartilage restoration surgery on his left knee in late October. He played in only 105 games last season, batting .293/.369/.392 with seven home runs and 62 RBI in 463 plate appearances. His offensive stats were his worst since an abnormally-bad 2014 campaign.

The 34-15 Red Sox have baseball’s best record. Eduardo Nunez has mostly been handling second base in Pedroia’s place, hitting a disappointing .243/.261/.361 in 177 trips to the plate. He has also, by most metrics, played subpar defense at the position, so getting Pedroia back will be a boon.