Marlins trade Logan Morrison to Mariners

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Not satisfied with adding Corey Hart to the lineup today the Mariners have also acquired Logan Morrison from the Marlins for right-hander Carter Capps, according to Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald.

Morrison has been mostly injured and ineffective for the past two seasons, hitting just .236 with a .708 OPS in 178 total games, but he has good plate discipline and 25-homer power from the left side of the plate and is still just 26 years old.

Hart and Morrison both have plenty of previous outfield experience, so the Mariners will divvy up the first base, left field, and designated hitter playing time three ways among Hart, Morrison, and Justin Smoak. And whatever chance there was of Kendrys Morales re-signing with Seattle is now gone.

Capps was the Mariners’ third-round pick in 2011 and has struggled in the majors so far with a 5.04 ERA, but he throws in the high-90s and has racked up 94 strikeouts in 84 innings after posting awesome numbers in the minors. He’s also 23 years old, so there’s definitely plenty of upside for a late-inning bullpen role in Miami.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.