Managers, GMs to meet today to discuss the abolition of home plate collisions

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At a time when concussions have become the most significant injury on the minds of athletes, coaches, teams and — increasingly — the legal system, baseball will move today to consider abolishing home plate collisions.

As Derrick Goold reported this morning, this past weekend, team trainers and medical officials were told in a presentation here in Florida that 22 percent of all concussions in baseball are caused by collisions, most of which happen at home plate. Major League Baseball will hear from managers and executives today will meet to discuss a ban. Expected to speak, Goold notes, are Cardinals manager Mike Matheny who himself had his career end due to concussions, and Bruce Bochy, also a former catcher, and the manager of Buster Posey, who missed significant time in 2011 after breaking his leg in a home plate collision.

It’s a shame we see so many collisions anyway, as the rules of the game clearly state that a player without a ball is not allowed to block the plate. Likewise, nothing apart from odd tradition provides that a runner who is approaching a base where a fielder waits to tag him with the ball can or should violently prevent it.

While it’s uncertain if a rule change will be adopted, if one is, it will likely specifically provide that the baserunner is to (a) be given an avenue toward the plate and (b) is not allowed to target the catcher physically.

Here’s hoping Matheny and Bochy’s side of things prevails. Baseball is not a contact sport and shouldn’t be allowed to continue to be in this one, odd and dangerous area.

Mike Trout has been really good at baseball lately

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“Water wet,” “Sky blue,” “Dog bites man” and “Mike Trout good” are not exactly newsworthy sentiments, but once in a while you have to state the obvious just so you can look back later and make sure you were, in the moment, aware of the obvious.

And to be fair, “Mike Trout good” is underselling the Angels outfielder lately. He’s on the greatest tear of his great career lately, and dang it, that’s worthy of a few words on this blog.

Last night Trout went a mere 1-for-1, but that’s because the Diamondbacks were smart enough not to pitch to him too much, walking him twice. There was no one on base the first time he came up and he got a free pass. There was a guy on first but two outs the second time, so he was once again not given much to hit and took his base again. Arizona was not so lucky the third time. The bases were loaded and there was nowhere to put Trout. He smacked the first pitch he saw for a two-run single. They probably shoulda just walked him anyway, limiting the damage to one. The last time up he reached on catcher’s interference. Maybe Arizona figured that literally grabbing the bat from him with a catcher’s mitt was the best bet?

If so you can’t blame them, really. Not with the month he’s had. In June, Trout is hitting .448/.554/.776 with five homers. He currently leads the league in the following categories: home runs (23), runs (60), walks (64), on-base percentage (.469), OPS (1.158) OPS+ (219), total bases (179) and intentional walks (9). He currently has a bWAR of 6.5. WAR, in case you did not know, is a cumulative stat. When he won the 2014 MVP Award, he “only” had 7.6 for the entire year.

Sadly, one man does not a team make, so the Angels are only 9-8 in the month of June and have fallen far back of the red-hot Houston Astros and Seattle Mariners in the division race. For this reason I suspect a lot of people are going to do what they’ve long done and overlook Mike Trout’s sheer dominance or, even more ridiculously, claim he is overrated or something (believe me, I’ve seen it even this month).

Feel free to ignore those people and concentrate instead on the greatest baseball player in the game today, who has somehow managed to up his game in recent weeks.