Joey Votto creates foundation to help those suffering from PTSD

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Joey Votto contributes to a good cause on the baseball field by getting on base nearly one out of every two times he comes to the plate, and hitting for power to boot. But now he’s contributing to a great cause off the field with the creation of the Joey Votto Foundation, aimed to support victims of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.

PTSD is a condition people tend to develop after a traumatic event, as the name would imply. The condition is commonly linked with service men and women returning from combat overseas, but affects victims of sexual assault, nonsexual violence, and in Votto’s case, an unexpected death of a close family member or friend. As Votto details in a column for the Cincinnati Enquirer, his father died unexpectedly and it affected Votto profoundly. It wasn’t until he received treatment for PTSD that he understood the magnitude of the condition.

In 2008, during my second year in the majors, my father passed away suddenly. My grief led to overwhelming panic attacks and bouts of depression that landed me on the disabled list due to stress the following season.

I received much needed and very effective treatment.

Without it, I am not sure where I would be today.

I’ve combined my personal perspective on the healing power of clinical professionals with my appreciation for the deserving military heroes who need similar help. As a result, my off-the-field focus these days is on fighting for the cause of veterans and service members who need help healing their nonphysical wounds.

While Votto has been a polarizing figure recently in the ongoing feud between fans of traditional stats and fans of Sabermetrics, the Joey Votto Foundation is something everyone can get behind and support.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?